E Major Key - Building Blocks Lesson


mhmorris
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mhmorris
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09/12/2023 5:38 am

I just worked through Anders' lesson in the Rock series entitled Understanding the Building Blocks: Let's Analyse a Progression. He describes a progression with E, G, D, A and B and determines it to be in the key of E as starts and ends with an E chord. He then shows how the G is a flat 3 and the D is a flat 7. A is the fourth and B the fifth. I'm a bit confused because the key of E doesn't include a flat 3 and flat 7. The chords in E major include a major 3 (G sharp minor) and a major 7 (D sharp diminished). So, how can we conclude that the profession is in the key of E?


# 1
ChristopherSchlegel
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ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,305
09/12/2023 12:20 pm
#1 Originally Posted by: mhmorris

I just worked through Anders' lesson in the Rock series entitled Understanding the Building Blocks: Let's Analyse a Progression. He describes a progression with E, G, D, A and B and determines it to be in the key of E as starts and ends with an E chord. He then shows how the G is a flat 3 and the D is a flat 7. A is the fourth and B the fifth. I'm a bit confused because the key of E doesn't include a flat 3 and flat 7. The chords in E major include a major 3 (G sharp minor) and a major 7 (D sharp diminished). So, how can we conclude that the profession is in the key of E?

Most of the notes of those chords are in the key of E major, the E (I), A (IV) & B (V) chords.  The root notes of the G & D are not in the key of E major, but it's not necessary for every note of all the chords to only be notes from one scale or key signature.  In fact that's where many songs, melodies, riffs get their interesting parts from: a note or chord that's outside the key for variety.


Anders is demonstrating that you can find the interval distance & relationship of any given chord (in or out of the key) by reference to the tonic chord, the "one chord" in this case E major (I).


You would have to adjust your melody (vocal or instrumental), or riffs, solo licks to match the chord tones of those chords when they happen in the music.


This is called modulation when we use a chord or notes outside the key signature for variety.


I go into more detail about this in my tutorials on improvisation.


https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial/876


https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial/2329


In particular check out the lessons on modulation or using chords outside the key signature.


Hope that helps!


 


Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 2
adelinebradshaw1
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adelinebradshaw1
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09/16/2023 11:12 am

Anders' analysis might involve borrowing chords from the parallel minor key, E minor, which includes G natural and D natural. This adds harmonic variety and color to the progression in E major. If you're looking for a great article to get you started on your academic journey, I highly suggest you for edubirdie essays check out this article on Finance yahoo called "EduBirdie empowers students with innovative academic writing solutions." It's more than just a read, it's a chance to find out how EduBirdie could help you reach your goals. This could be a great help for us to succeed in our studies.


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# 3
mhmorris
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mhmorris
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09/17/2023 8:31 am
#2 Originally Posted by: ChristopherSchlegel

Most of the notes of those chords are in the key of E major, the E (I), A (IV) & B (V) chords.  The root notes of the G & D are not in the key of E major, but it's not necessary for every note of all the chords to only be notes from one scale or key signature.  In fact that's where many songs, melodies, riffs get their interesting parts from: a note or chord that's outside the key for variety.


Anders is demonstrating that you can find the interval distance & relationship of any given chord (in or out of the key) by reference to the tonic chord, the "one chord" in this case E major (I).


You would have to adjust your melody (vocal or instrumental), or riffs, solo licks to match the chord tones of those chords when they happen in the music.


This is called modulation when we use a chord or notes outside the key signature for variety.


I go into more detail about this in my tutorials on improvisation.


https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial/876


https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial/2329


In particular check out the lessons on modulation or using chords outside the key signature.


Hope that helps!


 

Hi Christopher


Amazing, thanks for the thorough answer. This really does help.


All the best


# 4
ChristopherSchlegel
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Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,305
ChristopherSchlegel
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Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,305
09/17/2023 1:42 pm
#4 Originally Posted by: mhmorris

Hi Christopher


Amazing, thanks for the thorough answer. This really does help.


All the best

You're welcome!


Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 5

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