Yellow Ledbetter


paulcavaliere
Full Access
Joined: 11/05/20
Posts: 118

Hi Dave,

I've just finished the Rock Level 2 course and now learning Yellow Ledbetter using your lesson. Great song and really enjoying your lesson on it. Thank you. Really trying to nail down barre chords with my thumb over the neck. With short fingers its a little tough but I'm managing and with practice using this song getting better at it.

My question is more on the theory. The very first bar is a variation on E. If the E barre chord using the 5th string root is played on frets 7 and 9, how is it still an E if the first bar of the song is played on the 9th and 11th frets? Why isn't it considered an F#?

Thanks,

Paul


# 1
Dave Celentano
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 07/29/14
Posts: 281

Thanks Paul and glad you are enjoying my lesson on Yellow Ledbetter! Good question on the E chord. First, an 'E' (E major) chord consists of three notes = E, G#, and B. Any combination of these three notes anywhere on the neck results in an 'E' chord. In first bar of Yellow Ledbetter the focus is on the same three notes at the 9th fret on the D, G, and B strings, which are held by the barring index finger. The notes played at the 11th frets are embelishments on the E chord and not chord tones. This style of playing is reminiscent of Little Wing and Wind Cries Mary from Jimi Hendrix.

Hope this clears things up a little.

-Dave

Originally Posted by: paulcavaliere

Hi Dave,

I've just finished the Rock Level 2 course and now learning Yellow Ledbetter using your lesson. Great song and really enjoying your lesson on it. Thank you. Really trying to nail down barre chords with my thumb over the neck. With short fingers its a little tough but I'm managing and with practice using this song getting better at it.

My question is more on the theory. The very first bar is a variation on E. If the E barre chord using the 5th string root is played on frets 7 and 9, how is it still an E if the first bar of the song is played on the 9th and 11th frets? Why isn't it considered an F#?

Thanks,

Paul


# 2