Theory links


R. Shackleferd
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R. Shackleferd
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02/03/2007 10:23 pm
I did a brief search here to see about any recommended sites on the subject but didn't come across much. In the beginning I absorbed some concepts of theory, but what I did understand was difficult to apply to actual spontaneous music or think about while actually playing, and have since pretty much ignored it to my own deficit. Of course now I realize the limits of "winging it" so to speak, and want to explore it further.

Obviously there's the tutorials and lessons here covering theory, not to mention just the pure discussion aspect of this part of the forum, but do ya'll have any other sites you'd like to recommend? This might be useful for not only myself, but any others looking for all the resources available.

Following are the links of the whole thread:
musictheory.net
cyberfret.com
theory workbooks
teoria.com
zentao.com
essentialguitar.com
complex circle of 5ths
tonalityguide.com
schenkerguide.com

Blank papers for printing:
various guitar grids (fretboards) <--links to .pdf file
various sheet music, tab, and grids
fretboards with inlay markers
blanksheetmusic.net
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# 1
ChristopherSchlegel
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ChristopherSchlegel
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02/04/2007 4:53 am
Great idea for a thread!

musictheory.net does look good. neat design and somewhat interactive. Check out the "Analysis" lessons. Pretty good stuff there.

Couple of my faves:
http://www.tonalityguide.com/
http://www.schenkerguide.com/

Schenkerian analysis is pretty specialized and complex stuff - but quite powerful if you understand how & when to use it.
Originally Posted by: R. ShackleferdIn the beginning I absorbed some concepts of theory, but what I did understand was difficult to apply to actual spontaneous music or think about while actually playing, and have since pretty much ignored it to my own deficit. Of course now I realize the limits of "winging it" so to speak, and want to explore it further.

Just using this part as a springboard for some general thoughts.

There really is no way to "not use theory" when playing music. You can certainly not know the theory behind what you are doing. But the bottom line is that if you are playing music - notes, scales, chords, songs, etc. - you are in fact already using theory.

An analogy would be how as children we generally learn to speak before we know how to spell or be able to explain the rules of grammatical structure and the syntax of language. But ultimately if you want to improve at using language you must learn to understand the conceptual knowledge (literally, the "theory") that is the foundation for the application (literally, the "practice") of the words you are speaking.

An enormous amount of musical theory is contained in concepts such as "the major scale" or "a major chord". It is absolutely in any players interest to learn the theory behind the music they play. It will only improve your ability to think about and play music.
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# 2
R. Shackleferd
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R. Shackleferd
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02/09/2007 12:30 am
Originally Posted by: CSchlegelGreat idea for a thread!

I guess you're the only one who thought so. :confused: :)
But actually since delving in, I think some of the ones I linked to are pretty comprehensive for a relative novice like me. Like you said, musictheory.net is good, if not the best of those overall. teoria.com is also pretty good, being somewhat animated, illustrated, and interactive. But so far I'm prolly turning to the last one, zentao.com the most. I just like his explanations of concepts and he suggests, or rather insists ways to practice.

But between this site (which I also highly value of course), and all the ones I linked to, I'll have plenty of resources for my level of study.
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# 3
ren
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ren
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02/09/2007 10:38 am
Originally Posted by: R. ShackleferdI guess you're the only one who thought so. :confused: :)


I'm interested in sponging, but I've never really found anything good - hadn't seen most of the sites you've linked though... cyberfret I remember being how I found this place... :D

Check out my music, video, lessons & backing tracks here![br]https://www.renhimself.com

# 4
R. Shackleferd
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R. Shackleferd
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02/10/2007 12:16 am
Yeah, initially I wasn't really sure what was out there, but it does seem fairly limited. But I'm already learning a lot though from those.

And since this is somewhat related, I also came across this page, where a guy goes way into the circle of fifths. A lot of it goes over my head, or just seems overly complicated to be effectively useful, but still kinda interesting.
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# 5
dvenetian
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dvenetian
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02/10/2007 4:08 am
Originally Posted by: R. ShackleferdYeah, initially I wasn't really sure what was out there, but it does seem fairly limited. But I'm already learning a lot though from those.

And since this somewhat related, I also came across this page, where a guy goes way into the circle of fifths. A lot of it goes over my head, or just seems over complicated to be effectively useful, but still kinda interesting.

You aren't kidding, that is the most intense Circle of fifths site that I've ever seen!!!!!!! Extremely complexed.
The reason I like players who post their theory topics is it allows others who are interested to interact with the topic. Links Don't. Since this is a Guitar forum, the theory relates to those playing guitar, not white or black keys.
I have benefited greatly from interaction with others in theory because most of it is in easier terms and if you miss something, you can always post a question like "What do you mean by Complementary Intervals"?
I think that some sites offer too much information and it becomes an overload for most, so they tune out on theory, thinking it's too complexed.
# 6
R. Shackleferd
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R. Shackleferd
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02/10/2007 4:46 am
Originally Posted by: dvenetianYou aren't kidding, that is the most intense Circle of fifths site that I've ever seen!!!!!!! Extremely complexed.[/QUOTE]
That's only his circle of fifths article. He goes into other aspects as well, with an equally complex mathematical analysis...which went even further over my head!
Originally Posted by: dvenetianThe reason I like players who post their theory topics is it allows others who are interested to interact with the topic. Links Don't. Since this is a Guitar forum, the theory relates to those playing guitar, not white or black keys.

Yeah I know what you mean. The zentao.com is from a guitar perspective, which is one reason I'm preferring it even over the more comprehensive animated sites.
[QUOTE=dvenetian]I have benefited greatly from interaction with others in theory because most of it is in easier terms and if you miss something, you can always post a question like "What do you mean by Complementary Intervals"?
I think that some sites offer too much information and it becomes an overload for most, so they tune out on theory, thinking it's too complexed.

Agreed. I'm trying to not bite off more than I can chew at the moment, making sure I fully grasp whatever before moving on. But this will be the one of the 1st places I turn to upon being stuck.
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# 7
dvenetian
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dvenetian
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02/10/2007 5:43 am
Originally Posted by: R. Shackleferd

Agreed. I'm trying to not bite off more than I can chew at the moment, making sure I fully grasp whatever before moving on. But this will be the one of the 1st places I turn to upon being stuck.

That's another good point that you make. If you are studying from a site and get stuck on something, you can always post the question in the forum and maybe a member can shed some light on the subject.
# 8
R. Shackleferd
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R. Shackleferd
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02/10/2007 6:08 am
I just wanted to add essentialguitar.com
It's certainly nothing fancy or does it look all encompassing, but since it's guitar oriented I thought I'd share it. I forgot I had this one bookmarked already from a few months ago.
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# 9
polansky
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polansky
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02/11/2007 4:34 am
Originally Posted by: CSchlegelGreat idea for a thread!



Oh no Rust, this is a pretty good one I just bookmarked all of them, I'm must intrested in methods to learn all the notes in the fretboard.

Rock on bro.
Power corrupts. Absolute power is kinda neat.
# 10
R. Shackleferd
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R. Shackleferd
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02/11/2007 5:42 am
That's actually not too hard. I've had it down for years, but putting it to more use is where I'm at now. :)
I think you'll find the general consensus is to learn the notes on the E and A bass strings first. Then from the 2 fret octaves found in barre chords (which you're prolly already aware of) you can deduce the D and G strings respectively, eventually absorbing each note's location without "cheating".
G---------------2---3---4-----
D--2---3---4------------------
A---------------0---1---2-----ect...
E--0---1---2------------------

And since you obviously learned 2 in 1 with the low and high E, you just have the B string left.
Starting out you might also just try and concentrate on the location of all the natural notes on every string, then you can almost automatically see the sharp/flat notes. Whether you call it a sharp or flat is another topic.
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# 11
R. Shackleferd
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R. Shackleferd
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02/11/2007 11:46 pm
Also wanted to share a few of the better places I've found blank papers for printing...staff, tablature, and fretboards, stuff to use when you want to write out songs, scales, chords, whatever. I'll also gather up all the links and put em in the first post for subsequent browswers.

various guitar grids (fretboards) <--links to .pdf file
various sheet music, tab, and grids
fretboards with inlay markers
[FONT=Palatino Linotype]"Bust a nut!" - Dimebag
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." - Einstein
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# 12
ChristopherSchlegel
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ChristopherSchlegel
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02/12/2007 3:40 pm
Originally Posted by: R. ShackleferdAlso wanted to share a few of the better places I've found blank papers for printing.

More good links, thanks! I like this one, nifty drag and drop options. Look in the "Advanced" tab to add multiple staves - like for Treble clef and TAB together.
http://www.blanksheetmusic.net/
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# 13

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