What are your all time rock concert highlight?

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manXcat

♪It's getting better all the time♫

Joined: 02/17/18

Posts: 1108

Originally Posted by: moosehockey18

So many shows............ Hard to pick favorites but these are 4 that stick out in my mind.

1) Bruce Springsteen 1984. Saw him at the old Civic Arena in Pittsburgh where I grew up. He and his band played for 4 hours. Came out for several encores; the last one was Santa Clause is Coming to Town. The concert was in September !

2) John Denver early 1970`s. My first concert ! I came to identify with his music probably more than any other artist and He`s at least partially responsible for the fact that I live in the mountains today. My wife and I saw him 3 more times in the 80`s and 90`s.

3) America, 2013 at the Community Music Center in Wolfeboro NH. My wife and I saw them a few times during their heyday in the 70`s, but this concert cost 30 bucks a ticket and the facility held maybe 2000 people, so the show was a wonderfully intimate experience. They sounded great and played all their hits. It was like being in the 70`s again, except this time our grown daughters were with us !

4) Trans Siberian Orchestra ( multiple years ) It`s a Holiday concert but their production and stage show are second to none. Spellbinding !

Two concerts there which leave me in envy moosehockey18, in the most complimentary sense.

John Denver was at his zenith when I bought my first acoustic guitar, and upon reflection was influential in the decision. Pretty sure I wore out his "An Evening with John Denver" double album in 1975,...figuratively. I still have that original on vinyl, replete with scratches.

America. Would have loved to have had the opportunity to have seen them in their early '70s heyday. Alongside Marvin Gaye's "What's Going On", America featured prominently in my easy listening as each album released. Have all of their '70s albums.

♪A little better all the time♫

#31

Originally Posted by: moosehockey18

So many shows............ Hard to pick favorites but these are 4 that stick out in my mind.

1) Bruce Springsteen 1984. Saw him at the old Civic Arena in Pittsburgh where I grew up. He and his band played for 4 hours. Came out for several encores; the last one was Santa Clause is Coming to Town. The concert was in September !

2) John Denver early 1970`s. My first concert ! I came to identify with his music probably more than any other artist and He`s at least partially responsible for the fact that I live in the mountains today. My wife and I saw him 3 more times in the 80`s and 90`s.

3) America, 2013 at the Community Music Center in Wolfeboro NH. My wife and I saw them a few times during their heyday in the 70`s, but this concert cost 30 bucks a ticket and the facility held maybe 2000 people, so the show was a wonderfully intimate experience. They sounded great and played all their hits. It was like being in the 70`s again, except this time our grown daughters were with us !

4) Trans Siberian Orchestra ( multiple years ) It`s a Holiday concert but their production and stage show are second to none. Spellbinding !

Two concerts there which leave me in envy moosehockey18, in the most complimentary sense.

John Denver was at his zenith when I bought my first acoustic guitar, and upon reflection was influential in the decision. Pretty sure I wore out his "An Evening with John Denver" double album in 1975,...figuratively. I still have that original on vinyl, replete with scratches.

America. Would have loved to have had the opportunity to have seen them in their early '70s heyday. Alongside Marvin Gaye's "What's Going On", America featured prominently in my easy listening as each album released. Have all of their '70s albums.

♪A little better all the time♫

robin79noordh

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Joined: 01/08/20

Posts: 18

Pearl Jam 2012 in Stockholm with my best mate who also loves them.

Stone Gossard Put his Guitar down to film the crowd with his phone saying -wow,this is like playing in the states-.

I saw then at Roskilde 2000 witch ended in tradegy for so many people (the band incl)

I was in a werry bad spot myself infront of the stage chipping for air.

So it was nice to c them again overcome and with sutch a positive vibe.

Mr.Bungle at the Astoria in London 1999 ich.

How a band that sounds like thay do can sound the same live as on the record is amazing.

A Perfect circle in Stockholm a couple of years ago.

We had a 2 day festival in Stockholm early 2000 called where the action is, thay did'nt sell to many tickets and went belly-up... but, I was there and saw Pixies, the pretenders , Neil Young and crazy horse, dinosaur Jr and Nick Cave and the bad seeds.

Nick Cave and the bad seeds I have seen many times over and thay are the best live act... in my book anyway.

great topic, there are some artists I never got to see like SRV, Allman brothers and B.B king.

but I got to see alot of my heroes live and Im really happy I did.

#32

Pearl Jam 2012 in Stockholm with my best mate who also loves them.

Stone Gossard Put his Guitar down to film the crowd with his phone saying -wow,this is like playing in the states-.

I saw then at Roskilde 2000 witch ended in tradegy for so many people (the band incl)

I was in a werry bad spot myself infront of the stage chipping for air.

So it was nice to c them again overcome and with sutch a positive vibe.

Mr.Bungle at the Astoria in London 1999 ich.

How a band that sounds like thay do can sound the same live as on the record is amazing.

A Perfect circle in Stockholm a couple of years ago.

We had a 2 day festival in Stockholm early 2000 called where the action is, thay did'nt sell to many tickets and went belly-up... but, I was there and saw Pixies, the pretenders , Neil Young and crazy horse, dinosaur Jr and Nick Cave and the bad seeds.

Nick Cave and the bad seeds I have seen many times over and thay are the best live act... in my book anyway.

great topic, there are some artists I never got to see like SRV, Allman brothers and B.B king.

but I got to see alot of my heroes live and Im really happy I did.

moosehockey18

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Joined: 02/01/20

Posts: 82

Originally Posted by: manXcat
Originally Posted by: moosehockey18

So many shows............ Hard to pick favorites but these are 4 that stick out in my mind.

1) Bruce Springsteen 1984. Saw him at the old Civic Arena in Pittsburgh where I grew up. He and his band played for 4 hours. Came out for several encores; the last one was Santa Clause is Coming to Town. The concert was in September !

2) John Denver early 1970`s. My first concert ! I came to identify with his music probably more than any other artist and He`s at least partially responsible for the fact that I live in the mountains today. My wife and I saw him 3 more times in the 80`s and 90`s.

3) America, 2013 at the Community Music Center in Wolfeboro NH. My wife and I saw them a few times during their heyday in the 70`s, but this concert cost 30 bucks a ticket and the facility held maybe 2000 people, so the show was a wonderfully intimate experience. They sounded great and played all their hits. It was like being in the 70`s again, except this time our grown daughters were with us !

4) Trans Siberian Orchestra ( multiple years ) It`s a Holiday concert but their production and stage show are second to none. Spellbinding !

Two concerts there which leave me in envy moosehockey18, in the most complimentary sense.

John Denver was at his zenith when I bought my first acoustic guitar, and upon reflection was influential in the decision. Pretty sure I wore out his "An Evening with John Denver" double album in 1975,...figuratively. I still have that original on vinyl, replete with scratches.

America. Would have loved to have had the opportunity to have seen them in their early '70s heyday. Alongside Marvin Gaye's "What's Going On", America featured prominently in my easy listening as each album released. Have all of their '70s albums.

Ahhhh.....An Evening with John Denver. I`ve got that album too ! As for America, just learned to play Sandman. Awesome song for an acoustic.

Peace.

#33

Originally Posted by: manXcat
Originally Posted by: moosehockey18

So many shows............ Hard to pick favorites but these are 4 that stick out in my mind.

1) Bruce Springsteen 1984. Saw him at the old Civic Arena in Pittsburgh where I grew up. He and his band played for 4 hours. Came out for several encores; the last one was Santa Clause is Coming to Town. The concert was in September !

2) John Denver early 1970`s. My first concert ! I came to identify with his music probably more than any other artist and He`s at least partially responsible for the fact that I live in the mountains today. My wife and I saw him 3 more times in the 80`s and 90`s.

3) America, 2013 at the Community Music Center in Wolfeboro NH. My wife and I saw them a few times during their heyday in the 70`s, but this concert cost 30 bucks a ticket and the facility held maybe 2000 people, so the show was a wonderfully intimate experience. They sounded great and played all their hits. It was like being in the 70`s again, except this time our grown daughters were with us !

4) Trans Siberian Orchestra ( multiple years ) It`s a Holiday concert but their production and stage show are second to none. Spellbinding !

Two concerts there which leave me in envy moosehockey18, in the most complimentary sense.

John Denver was at his zenith when I bought my first acoustic guitar, and upon reflection was influential in the decision. Pretty sure I wore out his "An Evening with John Denver" double album in 1975,...figuratively. I still have that original on vinyl, replete with scratches.

America. Would have loved to have had the opportunity to have seen them in their early '70s heyday. Alongside Marvin Gaye's "What's Going On", America featured prominently in my easy listening as each album released. Have all of their '70s albums.

Ahhhh.....An Evening with John Denver. I`ve got that album too ! As for America, just learned to play Sandman. Awesome song for an acoustic.

Peace.

manXcat

♪It's getting better all the time♫

Joined: 02/17/18

Posts: 1108

"Sandman" is a great tune.

Is there a song written or sung by America I don't like? Thank you Dan Peek, Dewey Bunnell, and Gerry Beckley.

Even their first hit "A Horse With No Name", chording such simple chords a beginner can play it, but is neverthless a superb development exercise in itself of strum pattern, timing, emphasis and phrasing to render it familiarly pleasing to the ear. Also an ideal song to use for practising vocal accompaniment due to its simplicity, the workload permitting focus on vocals.

I love so many of their tunes its hard to pick a favourite, but if I had to, it's one of their lesser known songs from their "Hat Trick" album. "Rainbow Song". There's just something about it that catches my ear and stirs my emotion.

♪A little better all the time♫

#34

"Sandman" is a great tune.

Is there a song written or sung by America I don't like? Thank you Dan Peek, Dewey Bunnell, and Gerry Beckley.

Even their first hit "A Horse With No Name", chording such simple chords a beginner can play it, but is neverthless a superb development exercise in itself of strum pattern, timing, emphasis and phrasing to render it familiarly pleasing to the ear. Also an ideal song to use for practising vocal accompaniment due to its simplicity, the workload permitting focus on vocals.

I love so many of their tunes its hard to pick a favourite, but if I had to, it's one of their lesser known songs from their "Hat Trick" album. "Rainbow Song". There's just something about it that catches my ear and stirs my emotion.

♪A little better all the time♫

JeffS65

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Joined: 10/07/08

Posts: 1404

Originally Posted by: manXcat

Is there a song written or sung by America I don't like? Thank you Dan Peek, Dewey Bunnell, and Gerry Beckley.

Even their first hit "A Horse With No Name", chording such simple chords a beginner can play it, but is neverthless a superb development exercise in itself of strum pattern, timing, emphasis and phrasing to render it familiarly pleasing to the ear. Also an ideal song to use for practising vocal accompaniment due to its simplicity, the workload permitting focus on vocals.

An unlikable song by America? Never!!

Even taking that point you made about simple chording like on Horse with No Name, mostly the same applies with Ventura Highway too. All and all, a simple song. Though that key single string melody that runs throughout is not as easy as it sounds.

The strength of those America songs is that uncanny ability to make a pleasing melody. At least to me, that's their strength. Even with simple chords, understanding the emotional content during the creation of a melody is an uncommon skill.

Any time I put on Ventura Highway, it makes my wife very happy. As a beginner guitar player, she's made it one of her goal songs. First she wants to tackle Jolene. Easy cowboy chords but the strumming is pretty brisk for a beginner.

Once she gets that down alright, she wants to do Ventura. She's a great singer but wants us to sing and harmonize it too someday....I may have to learn to be a better singer!

Funny side note about Bunnell and Beckley about their songwriting: In an interview, they said that Beckley wrote the 'indoor' songs (Sister Golden Hair) and Bunnell wrote the 'outdoor' songs (Ventura Highway). Funny insight in to their own writing.

#35

Originally Posted by: manXcat

Is there a song written or sung by America I don't like? Thank you Dan Peek, Dewey Bunnell, and Gerry Beckley.

Even their first hit "A Horse With No Name", chording such simple chords a beginner can play it, but is neverthless a superb development exercise in itself of strum pattern, timing, emphasis and phrasing to render it familiarly pleasing to the ear. Also an ideal song to use for practising vocal accompaniment due to its simplicity, the workload permitting focus on vocals.

An unlikable song by America? Never!!

Even taking that point you made about simple chording like on Horse with No Name, mostly the same applies with Ventura Highway too. All and all, a simple song. Though that key single string melody that runs throughout is not as easy as it sounds.

The strength of those America songs is that uncanny ability to make a pleasing melody. At least to me, that's their strength. Even with simple chords, understanding the emotional content during the creation of a melody is an uncommon skill.

Any time I put on Ventura Highway, it makes my wife very happy. As a beginner guitar player, she's made it one of her goal songs. First she wants to tackle Jolene. Easy cowboy chords but the strumming is pretty brisk for a beginner.

Once she gets that down alright, she wants to do Ventura. She's a great singer but wants us to sing and harmonize it too someday....I may have to learn to be a better singer!

Funny side note about Bunnell and Beckley about their songwriting: In an interview, they said that Beckley wrote the 'indoor' songs (Sister Golden Hair) and Bunnell wrote the 'outdoor' songs (Ventura Highway). Funny insight in to their own writing.

manXcat

♪It's getting better all the time♫

Joined: 02/17/18

Posts: 1108

Meant to respond to this earlier with some quite specific commentary and thoughts, but life got in the way over the past couple of days as it does.

Originally Posted by: JeffS65
Even taking that point you made about simple chording like on Horse with No Name, mostly the same applies with Ventura Highway too. All and all, a simple song. Though that key single string melody that runs throughout is not as easy as it sounds.

Totally concur, making them appealing ideal subjects for learning, self-assessment of skill development/technique IMV. I find Dylan's material the same in many respects. Seemingly simple, but technique and delivery not so much with much to learn from performing them. e.g. "Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door", "Mr. Tambourine Man" -although acoustic or electric, I prefer to play in the different key of The Byrds' version suspecting influence of McGuinn's jangling melody on his 12 string Rickenbacker has much to do with that. Which is not to demean Dylan's capo'd key longer version, rather for various production and airplay reasons, regardless its brevity The Byrds version ended up the more melodically pleasing to my ear in the same way America's material does as pointed out below by you.

Originally Posted by: JeffS65
The strength of those America songs is that uncanny ability to make a pleasing melody. At least to me, that's their strength. Even with simple chords, understanding the emotional content during the creation of a melody is an uncommon skill

Wholeheartedly agree. The layering of rhythm and melody parts, predominantly acoustic although with electric bass and acompanying instruments in the studio, holds that magic for me.

Originally Posted by: JeffS65
Any time I put on Ventura Highway, it makes my wife very happy. As a beginner guitar player, she's made it one of her goal songs.

This is predominantly my reason for wanting to respond. Loving all of America's recorded material I've heard, " along with "Sister Golden Hair", "Ventura Highway" is a particular favourite which just makes me feel good whenever I hear it. Timeless, like the Mamas and the Papa's "California Dreamin'".

I wanted to share this with you her/you. There are several quite good tutes on the song including Shane's (easier), but I'm unashamedly biased in saying I don't think anyone nails it like Andy, or supplies as much accuracy & detail. I also find him an extraordinary communicator and his playing is flawless insofar as my rudimentary erudition with guitar can discern. In this demo he illustrates the three acoustic parts. The rhythm part is particularly well taught and executed I thought. Here he presents the lesson on all three. I've learnt and can play that rhythm part at present, but haven't learned all three parts yet as it wasn't triaged to make it onto my immediate more challenging songs objective list for this year.

Importantly, I know from your prior comments that your wife is petite with hands to match. Andy has smallish hands for a guitar player similar in size to mine challenged with thumb over muting and big stretches, so I know that techniques he prefers and uses to achieve what he does will always be a fit with me even if a skill 'stretch' too far at times. IDK what he does for a crust, but suspect he's a professional session player.

Another song I wanted to share thinking of your comments which I suspect your wife will enjoy (?), and enjoy learning/playing as much - I know I do, is from a much later period but holds that same can't get of its feelgood going around in one's head. "Kiss Me" by Sixpence None The Richer, sung by the adorably appealing innocent girlie voice of the spiritually beautiful Leigh Nash. Perfect for a single acoustic guitar, and surprisingly easy to play, but for a single trickyish (or at least I found it so) recurring quickish change in both verse and chorus to the Dm. Beautiful chords, all open chords, a not too difficult single line melody all of which sounds fabulous with a single acoustic guitar (player) which Leigh generally has accompanying her vocal performance. A superb acoustic tutorial for "Kiss Me" can be found here. I think it will quickly prove within your wife's capability with benefit of your guidance -assuming she likes it of course, always the most important motivation. My wife and I both love it, and it's just joy to play.

Originally Posted by: JeffS65
She's a great singer but wants us to sing and harmonize it too someday....I may have to learn to be a better singer!

Already have the mics, I've just bought a second mic stand for my wife. She's not an experienced singer, but she's a great gal up for anything and had plenty of informal practice singing along to The Beatles harmonies since 1962! Albeit willingly, she's been seconded to disguise my vocals at improptu neighbours and friends singalong afternoons/evenings.

♪A little better all the time♫

#36

Meant to respond to this earlier with some quite specific commentary and thoughts, but life got in the way over the past couple of days as it does.

Originally Posted by: JeffS65
Even taking that point you made about simple chording like on Horse with No Name, mostly the same applies with Ventura Highway too. All and all, a simple song. Though that key single string melody that runs throughout is not as easy as it sounds.

Totally concur, making them appealing ideal subjects for learning, self-assessment of skill development/technique IMV. I find Dylan's material the same in many respects. Seemingly simple, but technique and delivery not so much with much to learn from performing them. e.g. "Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door", "Mr. Tambourine Man" -although acoustic or electric, I prefer to play in the different key of The Byrds' version suspecting influence of McGuinn's jangling melody on his 12 string Rickenbacker has much to do with that. Which is not to demean Dylan's capo'd key longer version, rather for various production and airplay reasons, regardless its brevity The Byrds version ended up the more melodically pleasing to my ear in the same way America's material does as pointed out below by you.

Originally Posted by: JeffS65
The strength of those America songs is that uncanny ability to make a pleasing melody. At least to me, that's their strength. Even with simple chords, understanding the emotional content during the creation of a melody is an uncommon skill

Wholeheartedly agree. The layering of rhythm and melody parts, predominantly acoustic although with electric bass and acompanying instruments in the studio, holds that magic for me.

Originally Posted by: JeffS65
Any time I put on Ventura Highway, it makes my wife very happy. As a beginner guitar player, she's made it one of her goal songs.

This is predominantly my reason for wanting to respond. Loving all of America's recorded material I've heard, " along with "Sister Golden Hair", "Ventura Highway" is a particular favourite which just makes me feel good whenever I hear it. Timeless, like the Mamas and the Papa's "California Dreamin'".

I wanted to share this with you her/you. There are several quite good tutes on the song including Shane's (easier), but I'm unashamedly biased in saying I don't think anyone nails it like Andy, or supplies as much accuracy & detail. I also find him an extraordinary communicator and his playing is flawless insofar as my rudimentary erudition with guitar can discern. In this demo he illustrates the three acoustic parts. The rhythm part is particularly well taught and executed I thought. Here he presents the lesson on all three. I've learnt and can play that rhythm part at present, but haven't learned all three parts yet as it wasn't triaged to make it onto my immediate more challenging songs objective list for this year.

Importantly, I know from your prior comments that your wife is petite with hands to match. Andy has smallish hands for a guitar player similar in size to mine challenged with thumb over muting and big stretches, so I know that techniques he prefers and uses to achieve what he does will always be a fit with me even if a skill 'stretch' too far at times. IDK what he does for a crust, but suspect he's a professional session player.

Another song I wanted to share thinking of your comments which I suspect your wife will enjoy (?), and enjoy learning/playing as much - I know I do, is from a much later period but holds that same can't get of its feelgood going around in one's head. "Kiss Me" by Sixpence None The Richer, sung by the adorably appealing innocent girlie voice of the spiritually beautiful Leigh Nash. Perfect for a single acoustic guitar, and surprisingly easy to play, but for a single trickyish (or at least I found it so) recurring quickish change in both verse and chorus to the Dm. Beautiful chords, all open chords, a not too difficult single line melody all of which sounds fabulous with a single acoustic guitar (player) which Leigh generally has accompanying her vocal performance. A superb acoustic tutorial for "Kiss Me" can be found here. I think it will quickly prove within your wife's capability with benefit of your guidance -assuming she likes it of course, always the most important motivation. My wife and I both love it, and it's just joy to play.

Originally Posted by: JeffS65
She's a great singer but wants us to sing and harmonize it too someday....I may have to learn to be a better singer!

Already have the mics, I've just bought a second mic stand for my wife. She's not an experienced singer, but she's a great gal up for anything and had plenty of informal practice singing along to The Beatles harmonies since 1962! Albeit willingly, she's been seconded to disguise my vocals at improptu neighbours and friends singalong afternoons/evenings.

♪A little better all the time♫

Tinpan

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Joined: 03/31/20

Posts: 104

Good call cat. Andy does ,some incredibly accurate song lesssons and seems to hear the little intricacies that others miss. Some great stones lessons too. He's awesome.

#37

Good call cat. Andy does ,some incredibly accurate song lesssons and seems to hear the little intricacies that others miss. Some great stones lessons too. He's awesome.

manXcat

♪It's getting better all the time♫

Joined: 02/17/18

Posts: 1108

You said it all Tinpan. Definitely my favourite/go to song lesson tutor. If he chose to go in that direction, I'd happily pay an annual sub to his website if it would permit him to go full time devoting his energy and unique skills to his transcriptions and tutes.🤘🕊

♪A little better all the time♫

#38

You said it all Tinpan. Definitely my favourite/go to song lesson tutor. If he chose to go in that direction, I'd happily pay an annual sub to his website if it would permit him to go full time devoting his energy and unique skills to his transcriptions and tutes.🤘🕊

♪A little better all the time♫