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andyrayres

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Joined: 05/31/20

Posts: 2

Hello from Cardiff, Wales. Attempting to surprise my guitar playing son by learning to play during lockdown. Not just a whim; always wanted to try but could never find the time. I'm 3 weeks in and my fingers are hanging off, practicing for around 30 minutes twice a day.

I am as far as simple E major. How are these chords named as they don't correspond witht the string? e.g. this one uses the G string....... Sorry if I missed it from a lesson.

My only main probelm so far is strumming. I often miss one of the strings or connect with another one. Funny how playing the wrong string somehow makes me swear...

Any tips? I think I am also doing it too hard....

#1

Hello from Cardiff, Wales. Attempting to surprise my guitar playing son by learning to play during lockdown. Not just a whim; always wanted to try but could never find the time. I'm 3 weeks in and my fingers are hanging off, practicing for around 30 minutes twice a day.

I am as far as simple E major. How are these chords named as they don't correspond witht the string? e.g. this one uses the G string....... Sorry if I missed it from a lesson.

My only main probelm so far is strumming. I often miss one of the strings or connect with another one. Funny how playing the wrong string somehow makes me swear...

Any tips? I think I am also doing it too hard....

DavesGuitarJourney

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Joined: 02/22/20

Posts: 263

Hi Andy, welcome! Sounds like you are off to a great start!

Understanding the chord names does require some music theory, which is covered in more detail as you progress through the GT lessons. The focus on the earliest lessons is just to get you playing, because, well -- that's why you're here!

But, what makes the simple E major an "E" is that the E chord consists of the notes "E", "G#", and "B". First finger on 1st fret of the G string is your G#, and then you have open B string and open E string to make up the other two notes.

There are a whole bunch of folks here who have joined with the idea of learning during the lockdown so you're in good company. I would just caution you to have realistic expectations about how long this will take and how rapidly you will be able to learn. Everyone describes it as a journey and there is no real destination! So try to enjoy the journey and don't put too much pressure on yourself.

On the strumming, it sounds like you probably have a lot of tension in your strumming hand and wrist and arm. That's normal at this point. You want to try to have a nice relaxed wrist. Most of the strum is with your wrist, but a little movement in the elbow too.

Hitting the wrong strings or missing the strings entirely? Yep. That's going to keep happening to you for a long time, but gradually it will happen less and less.

#2

Hi Andy, welcome! Sounds like you are off to a great start!

Understanding the chord names does require some music theory, which is covered in more detail as you progress through the GT lessons. The focus on the earliest lessons is just to get you playing, because, well -- that's why you're here!

But, what makes the simple E major an "E" is that the E chord consists of the notes "E", "G#", and "B". First finger on 1st fret of the G string is your G#, and then you have open B string and open E string to make up the other two notes.

There are a whole bunch of folks here who have joined with the idea of learning during the lockdown so you're in good company. I would just caution you to have realistic expectations about how long this will take and how rapidly you will be able to learn. Everyone describes it as a journey and there is no real destination! So try to enjoy the journey and don't put too much pressure on yourself.

On the strumming, it sounds like you probably have a lot of tension in your strumming hand and wrist and arm. That's normal at this point. You want to try to have a nice relaxed wrist. Most of the strum is with your wrist, but a little movement in the elbow too.

Hitting the wrong strings or missing the strings entirely? Yep. That's going to keep happening to you for a long time, but gradually it will happen less and less.

andyrayres

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Joined: 05/31/20

Posts: 2

Thank you. Good to know it's not just me!

#3

Thank you. Good to know it's not just me!

William MG

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Joined: 03/08/19

Posts: 827

Hello and welcome Andy

Just to add to what Dave has down, the "root" note determines the chord name. E is the root note of the E chord.

I am not sure whereyou are in your studies, and may or may not already know this, but the note "E" can be found in multiple positions on your fret board and therefore you can have multiple positions to make your E chord.

Knowing the root also helps you play appropriate scale(s).

Best of luck with your studies

"If it sounds cool, it is cool!"

Mike O

Works for me!

#4

Hello and welcome Andy

Just to add to what Dave has down, the "root" note determines the chord name. E is the root note of the E chord.

I am not sure whereyou are in your studies, and may or may not already know this, but the note "E" can be found in multiple positions on your fret board and therefore you can have multiple positions to make your E chord.

Knowing the root also helps you play appropriate scale(s).

Best of luck with your studies

"If it sounds cool, it is cool!"

Mike O

Works for me!

rtgwkg

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Joined: 07/18/18

Posts: 1

One thing that helped me enormously with strumming is using a lighter (as in paper thin) gauge pick.

#5

One thing that helped me enormously with strumming is using a lighter (as in paper thin) gauge pick.