Scales question

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bross.kyle

Full Access

Joined: 09/02/20

Posts: 3

I'm working through the 5 patterns of scales. When I get to patterns where the lowest root note isn't on the 6th string, how do I practice those patterns? Should I just play root to root, or how do I go about playing all the notes from 1st to 6th string? For instance, the 3rd pattern of Am Pentatonic, root is on the D string, 7th fret, and the highest root is the 10th fret of the B string. I've just been playing root to root but I don't want to develop that habit if I should be playing everything in the pattern.

Thanks!

#1

I'm working through the 5 patterns of scales. When I get to patterns where the lowest root note isn't on the 6th string, how do I practice those patterns? Should I just play root to root, or how do I go about playing all the notes from 1st to 6th string? For instance, the 3rd pattern of Am Pentatonic, root is on the D string, 7th fret, and the highest root is the 10th fret of the B string. I've just been playing root to root but I don't want to develop that habit if I should be playing everything in the pattern.

Thanks!

ChristopherSchlegel

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 08/09/05

Posts: 7371

Originally Posted by: bross.kyle
I'm working through the 5 patterns of scales.

What scales? In what patterns? Straight up & down? Sequences? In time?

Originally Posted by: bross.kyle
When I get to patterns where the lowest root note isn't on the 6th string, how do I practice those patterns?

It depends on what you intend to do with them. It can be beneficial to play the entire pattern of all notes that are available in any given position. If you want to learn how to solo over various chord progressions, then it will be useful to know where all the scale degrees are & to have the dexterity to get to them when necessary.

Originally Posted by: bross.kyle
Should I just play root to root, or how do I go about playing all the notes from 1st to 6th string?

What style of music do you want to play? What types of lines, licks or riffs do you intend to play with these scales?

For example, if you want to play over the IV chord of a progression, then it can be useful to know where the scale degrees for that chord are. And the root note of the IV chord is not the 1 of the scale! Likewise for all the other possible chords that aren't the tonic chord!

Originally Posted by: bross.kyle
For instance, the 3rd pattern of Am Pentatonic, root is on the D string, 7th fret, and the highest root is the 10th fret of the B string. I've just been playing root to root but I don't want to develop that habit if I should be playing everything in the pattern.

It really depends on what you want to do with these scales.

If you want to get serious about learning how to play all over the fretboard, then yes, play all the available notes of the scale in any given position.

If you just want to play certain rock or blues licks, then just work on those specific types of licks, learning how to play them & what the scale degrees are to understand the sound & how to use them.

For example, these exercises are aimed at learning & practicing all the notes of every pentatonic box pattern.

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=722

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=185

Alternately, these tutorials are aimed at connecting certain patterns within the boxes to make licks.

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=737

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=843

And these tutorials are more aimed at using the pentatonic boxes to target chord tones within chord changes.

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=217

So, it really depends on your musical goals. Hope that helps!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

#2

Originally Posted by: bross.kyle
I'm working through the 5 patterns of scales.

What scales? In what patterns? Straight up & down? Sequences? In time?

Originally Posted by: bross.kyle
When I get to patterns where the lowest root note isn't on the 6th string, how do I practice those patterns?

It depends on what you intend to do with them. It can be beneficial to play the entire pattern of all notes that are available in any given position. If you want to learn how to solo over various chord progressions, then it will be useful to know where all the scale degrees are & to have the dexterity to get to them when necessary.

Originally Posted by: bross.kyle
Should I just play root to root, or how do I go about playing all the notes from 1st to 6th string?

What style of music do you want to play? What types of lines, licks or riffs do you intend to play with these scales?

For example, if you want to play over the IV chord of a progression, then it can be useful to know where the scale degrees for that chord are. And the root note of the IV chord is not the 1 of the scale! Likewise for all the other possible chords that aren't the tonic chord!

Originally Posted by: bross.kyle
For instance, the 3rd pattern of Am Pentatonic, root is on the D string, 7th fret, and the highest root is the 10th fret of the B string. I've just been playing root to root but I don't want to develop that habit if I should be playing everything in the pattern.

It really depends on what you want to do with these scales.

If you want to get serious about learning how to play all over the fretboard, then yes, play all the available notes of the scale in any given position.

If you just want to play certain rock or blues licks, then just work on those specific types of licks, learning how to play them & what the scale degrees are to understand the sound & how to use them.

For example, these exercises are aimed at learning & practicing all the notes of every pentatonic box pattern.

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=722

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=185

Alternately, these tutorials are aimed at connecting certain patterns within the boxes to make licks.

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=737

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=843

And these tutorials are more aimed at using the pentatonic boxes to target chord tones within chord changes.

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=217

So, it really depends on your musical goals. Hope that helps!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

bross.kyle

Full Access

Joined: 09/02/20

Posts: 3

Hi Chris, Thanks for the response, and the time you took to answer my questions!

I'm working on the major, minor, pentatonic major, pentatonic minor and harmonic minor for now, and working through the keys. I'm currently practicing straight up and down for now, per the scale printouts from the toolbox (I'd love to see the ability to print the chord charts, too). I'm also practicing with a metronome, either straight quarters or playing the 2 & 4 in 4/4.

My goal is to be very well rounded, so I want to know the scales for every note, not necessarily just root to root. I'm working on rhythm and lead about 60/40, respectively.

I'm about 65% rock, 34% blues, and there's only one country artist that I care to learn most of his catalogue, so I'm listing that at 1% haha.

I'm ready to really start making licks out the scales and start playing to backing tracks, but will still work on splitting time playing rhythm.

Thank you again for the time in your response!

#3

Hi Chris, Thanks for the response, and the time you took to answer my questions!

I'm working on the major, minor, pentatonic major, pentatonic minor and harmonic minor for now, and working through the keys. I'm currently practicing straight up and down for now, per the scale printouts from the toolbox (I'd love to see the ability to print the chord charts, too). I'm also practicing with a metronome, either straight quarters or playing the 2 & 4 in 4/4.

My goal is to be very well rounded, so I want to know the scales for every note, not necessarily just root to root. I'm working on rhythm and lead about 60/40, respectively.

I'm about 65% rock, 34% blues, and there's only one country artist that I care to learn most of his catalogue, so I'm listing that at 1% haha.

I'm ready to really start making licks out the scales and start playing to backing tracks, but will still work on splitting time playing rhythm.

Thank you again for the time in your response!

ChristopherSchlegel

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 08/09/05

Posts: 7371

You're welcome for the reply!

Originally Posted by: bross.kyle

I'm working on the major, minor, pentatonic major, pentatonic minor and harmonic minor for now, and working through the keys. I'm currently practicing straight up and down for now, per the scale printouts from the toolbox (I'd love to see the ability to print the chord charts, too). I'm also practicing with a metronome, either straight quarters or playing the 2 & 4 in 4/4.

Great plan. I have tutorials on how to cover the fretboard with diatonic major & minor scales as well. At the end of each tutorial I demo an exercise using all 12 scales that you might find useful. The first set covers one octave, the second set covers two octaves.

Major Scale Patterns 1

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=453

Minor Scale Patterns 1

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=887

Major Scale Patterns 2

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=2643

Minor Scale Patterns 2

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=2646

Originally Posted by: bross.kyle
I'm about 65% rock, 34% blues, and there's only one country artist that I care to learn most of his catalogue, so I'm listing that at 1% haha.[/p]

I'm ready to really start making licks out the scales and start playing to backing tracks, but will still work on splitting time playing rhythm.

Sounds great! When you are ready you should also start learning songs & licks by artists you enjoy. Playing rhythm is much more satisfying when you can apply it to actual song parts. And lead guitar playing requires that you have a repertoire of licks to play.

I have a lot of material that can help with that stuff, too! Let me know if you need more help. Best of success!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

#4

You're welcome for the reply!

Originally Posted by: bross.kyle

I'm working on the major, minor, pentatonic major, pentatonic minor and harmonic minor for now, and working through the keys. I'm currently practicing straight up and down for now, per the scale printouts from the toolbox (I'd love to see the ability to print the chord charts, too). I'm also practicing with a metronome, either straight quarters or playing the 2 & 4 in 4/4.

Great plan. I have tutorials on how to cover the fretboard with diatonic major & minor scales as well. At the end of each tutorial I demo an exercise using all 12 scales that you might find useful. The first set covers one octave, the second set covers two octaves.

Major Scale Patterns 1

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=453

Minor Scale Patterns 1

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=887

Major Scale Patterns 2

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=2643

Minor Scale Patterns 2

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=2646

Originally Posted by: bross.kyle
I'm about 65% rock, 34% blues, and there's only one country artist that I care to learn most of his catalogue, so I'm listing that at 1% haha.[/p]

I'm ready to really start making licks out the scales and start playing to backing tracks, but will still work on splitting time playing rhythm.

Sounds great! When you are ready you should also start learning songs & licks by artists you enjoy. Playing rhythm is much more satisfying when you can apply it to actual song parts. And lead guitar playing requires that you have a repertoire of licks to play.

I have a lot of material that can help with that stuff, too! Let me know if you need more help. Best of success!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory