Where to learn more theory?

Guitar Tricks Forum > Music Theory > Where to learn more theory?

ChristopherSchlegel

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 08/09/05

Posts: 7753

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier
I expected this site to cover anything about chord constructions and how to play melodies over chord progressions. So I started out with blues level 1 and learned a lot,[/p]

but now I'm in level 2...

You might want to work through my older course that includes a little more theory.

https://www.guitartricks.com/course.php?input=fundamentals2(discontinued)

Most beginners do not want that much theory. They just want to play the guitar! But if you are interested in it, I have a whole collection of tutorials on music theory.

https://www.guitartricks.com/collection/music-theory

As well as a collection on improvisation, which is essentially what you mention when you say playing melodies over chord progressions.

https://www.guitartricks.com/collection/learning-to-improvise

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier

Here the teacher (hans andersen) is playing too fast for my skill. He is just shredding away on these basic licks and it's not really motivating for a beginner because I sound like a noob compared to him.

There's going to be a point in everyone's learning that they hit a wall. The next lick or idea is just beyond your current skill level! At that point you just have keep working on it. To put in the time practicing until you can do that technique. But it's important to keep working on other things as well.

So, I encourage you to keep working on the blues course if that's your goal. Go forward in the course to see what's ahead. But make time in your practice to build your technique until you can play the ideas that were harder for you when you first encountered them.

You can also, start working through those tutorials I mentioned above. And of course, start learning songs! Pick some tunes to learn!

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier
I feel like there is not enough stress on music theory going from blues level 1 into level2.2 levels seems not much for everything there is to learn about the blues.

I'm quoting this because there are 2 separate issues that I think you might be conflating.

Music theory is understanding what you are playing. Conceptual knowledge about how to identify & understand the relationship between the notes, chords & rhythms you are playing. Knowing why to play some series of notes as a lick is important, but it won't help you to actually play the lick. That requires repetitious practice.

Technique is simply being able to actually play the notes, chords & rhythms. Being able to play the lick takes time, but it won't explain what the notes are or how & why they work.

The whole point here is that they are 2 separate issues. They are dealt with in the course. Anders usually mentions the theory briefly, but spends more time on showing you what to play. That's because a little theory goes a long way!

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier
The increase in difficulty (mostly speed) is also worth noting. The teacher keeps saying I should "make it my own" although I can clearly see him reading the notes off a music sheet...

Well, yes. He reading scripted material because it's an organized curriculum. :) Everything has to be planned ahead of time so he knows what to say & play & the notation can match & so everything is integrated.

The point behind saying make it your own is that you have to put in the repetitious practice time in order to make your hands do those tricky things as if they are second nature. And that takes a lot of time!

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier
How am I supposed to improvise if I haven't learned everything about blues theory first, like triads for example? And what notes to stress when soloing over a basic chord progression?[/p]

Even if you learned everything about theory that's no guarantee you could play anything. You have to have a working vocabulary of licks, of little melodic phrases & ideas that you can already play, that you have under your command, before you can improvise.

So, while you are gradually working on physical technique & licks, you learn a little bit about music theory of the licks along the way.

Anders does eventually go into chord tone soloing in the course. I don't know where you are in the course. But I encourage you to make the time to work on theory & technique as separate things that you can gradually put together.

See if the links I gave you above help. Let me know if you have any other questions! Best of success!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

#1

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier
I expected this site to cover anything about chord constructions and how to play melodies over chord progressions. So I started out with blues level 1 and learned a lot,[/p]

but now I'm in level 2...

You might want to work through my older course that includes a little more theory.

https://www.guitartricks.com/course.php?input=fundamentals2(discontinued)

Most beginners do not want that much theory. They just want to play the guitar! But if you are interested in it, I have a whole collection of tutorials on music theory.

https://www.guitartricks.com/collection/music-theory

As well as a collection on improvisation, which is essentially what you mention when you say playing melodies over chord progressions.

https://www.guitartricks.com/collection/learning-to-improvise

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier

Here the teacher (hans andersen) is playing too fast for my skill. He is just shredding away on these basic licks and it's not really motivating for a beginner because I sound like a noob compared to him.

There's going to be a point in everyone's learning that they hit a wall. The next lick or idea is just beyond your current skill level! At that point you just have keep working on it. To put in the time practicing until you can do that technique. But it's important to keep working on other things as well.

So, I encourage you to keep working on the blues course if that's your goal. Go forward in the course to see what's ahead. But make time in your practice to build your technique until you can play the ideas that were harder for you when you first encountered them.

You can also, start working through those tutorials I mentioned above. And of course, start learning songs! Pick some tunes to learn!

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier
I feel like there is not enough stress on music theory going from blues level 1 into level2.2 levels seems not much for everything there is to learn about the blues.

I'm quoting this because there are 2 separate issues that I think you might be conflating.

Music theory is understanding what you are playing. Conceptual knowledge about how to identify & understand the relationship between the notes, chords & rhythms you are playing. Knowing why to play some series of notes as a lick is important, but it won't help you to actually play the lick. That requires repetitious practice.

Technique is simply being able to actually play the notes, chords & rhythms. Being able to play the lick takes time, but it won't explain what the notes are or how & why they work.

The whole point here is that they are 2 separate issues. They are dealt with in the course. Anders usually mentions the theory briefly, but spends more time on showing you what to play. That's because a little theory goes a long way!

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier
The increase in difficulty (mostly speed) is also worth noting. The teacher keeps saying I should "make it my own" although I can clearly see him reading the notes off a music sheet...

Well, yes. He reading scripted material because it's an organized curriculum. :) Everything has to be planned ahead of time so he knows what to say & play & the notation can match & so everything is integrated.

The point behind saying make it your own is that you have to put in the repetitious practice time in order to make your hands do those tricky things as if they are second nature. And that takes a lot of time!

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier
How am I supposed to improvise if I haven't learned everything about blues theory first, like triads for example? And what notes to stress when soloing over a basic chord progression?[/p]

Even if you learned everything about theory that's no guarantee you could play anything. You have to have a working vocabulary of licks, of little melodic phrases & ideas that you can already play, that you have under your command, before you can improvise.

So, while you are gradually working on physical technique & licks, you learn a little bit about music theory of the licks along the way.

Anders does eventually go into chord tone soloing in the course. I don't know where you are in the course. But I encourage you to make the time to work on theory & technique as separate things that you can gradually put together.

See if the links I gave you above help. Let me know if you have any other questions! Best of success!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

dimi.chevalier

Registered User

Joined: 02/20/19

Posts: 1

Thank you very much Christopher! I find your lessons to be very informative so far. Just had a huge revelation in your lesson on inversions :)

Forgive me for being a little frustrated the other day, I'm new to this site so it is kind of hard finding my way around here.

I had no clue there were more lessons on the blues in general. Over the last weeks I have been able to build some licks with the things I have learned and just by trying things out in the minor blues scale. But they just sound so ordinary!

Guess I will take a step back from the main course for a while until I get better, because there is a gap to be filled moving from level 1 into level 2.

For example: I hear Mr Andersen resolve to the fifth in his solos (I looked it up on the internet) but I have only learned resolving to the root of the I chord so far. Or when you change to the IV chord I've heard there are other things you can do than just play the same licks from the minor pentatonic scale you used on the I chord.

Hopefully your lessons can fill me in on these concepts.

I would rather focus on these things first with some slow blues so I can make sure I use the right technique and learn more about soloing at the same time.

Unfortunately, I have noticed you can develop bad habits from trying to play too fast because I had to fix mine when I started out with my acoustic guitar.

( I tried to play Neil Young - old man

in sixteenth notes, which was a stupid thing to do as a complete beginner)

So I want to avoid that, but it's really hard keeping up with the tempo in blues level two, especially when I try to play in full triplets.

In my humble opinion your lessons should be included to the main blues program. That would make it a lot easier to navigate and they are really helpful as well.

Anyways, hopefully you have a great day.

Cheers from Hungary

#2

Thank you very much Christopher! I find your lessons to be very informative so far. Just had a huge revelation in your lesson on inversions :)

Forgive me for being a little frustrated the other day, I'm new to this site so it is kind of hard finding my way around here.

I had no clue there were more lessons on the blues in general. Over the last weeks I have been able to build some licks with the things I have learned and just by trying things out in the minor blues scale. But they just sound so ordinary!

Guess I will take a step back from the main course for a while until I get better, because there is a gap to be filled moving from level 1 into level 2.

For example: I hear Mr Andersen resolve to the fifth in his solos (I looked it up on the internet) but I have only learned resolving to the root of the I chord so far. Or when you change to the IV chord I've heard there are other things you can do than just play the same licks from the minor pentatonic scale you used on the I chord.

Hopefully your lessons can fill me in on these concepts.

I would rather focus on these things first with some slow blues so I can make sure I use the right technique and learn more about soloing at the same time.

Unfortunately, I have noticed you can develop bad habits from trying to play too fast because I had to fix mine when I started out with my acoustic guitar.

( I tried to play Neil Young - old man

in sixteenth notes, which was a stupid thing to do as a complete beginner)

So I want to avoid that, but it's really hard keeping up with the tempo in blues level two, especially when I try to play in full triplets.

In my humble opinion your lessons should be included to the main blues program. That would make it a lot easier to navigate and they are really helpful as well.

Anyways, hopefully you have a great day.

Cheers from Hungary

ChristopherSchlegel

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 08/09/05

Posts: 7753

You're welcome!

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier
Forgive me for being a little frustrated the other day, I'm new to this site so it is kind of hard finding my way around here.

No worries! If you are having a hard time finding what you want, then please just ask. That's what the forum is for! :)

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier
I had no clue there were more lessons on the blues in general.

GT content is organized into 3 main categories.

1. Structured curriculum like the courses, or collections: Guitar Fundamentals, blues, country, rock style courses.

https://www.guitartricks.com/beginner.php

Or the collections.

https://www.guitartricks.com/collections.php

2. Songs.

https://www.guitartricks.com/songs/

And you can sort & filter by styles, so you can see all the blues songs.

https://www.guitartricks.com/songs/blues

3. Instructor directories.

https://www.guitartricks.com/instructors.php

The courses are streamlined, but if you want to go deeper into any given technique or idea there is material that isn't part of a course. And all of those can be found in categories on the instructor directories. For example, I have a whole section on learning blues licks. Go to my directory & scroll down to the Learning Blues Licks section.

https://www.guitartricks.com/instructor.php?input=155014

I have about 20 tutorials from beginner to advanced grouped into little series to help you really drill down into learning blues licks & vocabulary.

Hope that helps! Please ask more if necessary & best of success with your guitar learning & playing!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

#3

You're welcome!

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier
Forgive me for being a little frustrated the other day, I'm new to this site so it is kind of hard finding my way around here.

No worries! If you are having a hard time finding what you want, then please just ask. That's what the forum is for! :)

Originally Posted by: dimi.chevalier
I had no clue there were more lessons on the blues in general.

GT content is organized into 3 main categories.

1. Structured curriculum like the courses, or collections: Guitar Fundamentals, blues, country, rock style courses.

https://www.guitartricks.com/beginner.php

Or the collections.

https://www.guitartricks.com/collections.php

2. Songs.

https://www.guitartricks.com/songs/

And you can sort & filter by styles, so you can see all the blues songs.

https://www.guitartricks.com/songs/blues

3. Instructor directories.

https://www.guitartricks.com/instructors.php

The courses are streamlined, but if you want to go deeper into any given technique or idea there is material that isn't part of a course. And all of those can be found in categories on the instructor directories. For example, I have a whole section on learning blues licks. Go to my directory & scroll down to the Learning Blues Licks section.

https://www.guitartricks.com/instructor.php?input=155014

I have about 20 tutorials from beginner to advanced grouped into little series to help you really drill down into learning blues licks & vocabulary.

Hope that helps! Please ask more if necessary & best of success with your guitar learning & playing!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory