What's a chord progression ???

Guitar Tricks Forum > Music Theory > What's a chord progression ???

New Member

Joined: 10/02/00

Posts: 26

are there any special chord progression for ever types of
muisc??
jimi

#1

are there any special chord progression for ever types of
muisc??
jimi

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 08/15/01

Posts: 9

Well, there aren't really set types of chord progression for every style of music, although there are popular chord progressions for every style of music. For example, the I IV V progression is very popular in blues, and also popular lots of rock.

#2

Well, there aren't really set types of chord progression for every style of music, although there are popular chord progressions for every style of music. For example, the I IV V progression is very popular in blues, and also popular lots of rock.

is Super Fabulous

Joined: 03/06/01

Posts: 1623

Re: What is a Chord Progression?

Well, not to sound like a smartass, but a chord progression is a progression of chords.

. . . or a series of chords played in succession.

There aren't any patterns set in stone, but there are some common ones.

I-IV-V for blues
I-II-VI for jazz
etc

#3

Re: What is a Chord Progression?

Well, not to sound like a smartass, but a chord progression is a progression of chords.

. . . or a series of chords played in succession.

There aren't any patterns set in stone, but there are some common ones.

I-IV-V for blues
I-II-VI for jazz
etc

New Member

Joined: 08/21/01

Posts: 3

More information !

To Peanucle - you mention the "I IV V progression" - what do the umbers stand for?

#4

More information !

To Peanucle - you mention the "I IV V progression" - what do the umbers stand for?

Moderator

Joined: 02/04/01

Posts: 731

The numbers stand for the chords of a certain key. For instance, the I chord in the key of C is C major. The IV chord is F maj, and the V chord is G maj. In the major scale the chords go like this: maj, min, min, maj, maj, diminished. So in C you have:
I - C maj
II - D min
III - E min
IV - F maj
V - Gmaj
VI - A min
VII - B Dim
The reason for this is that each chord contains three basic notes, the triad of the root (first note), the third (determines whether it is major or minor) and a fifth. To stay in the key of C, for each chord, this triad has to be built from notes within the key. So if you play a G chord you play G (the root), B (the major third, considered a mjor third if it is to whole tones up froom the root), and D (the fifth).
The chord of A has an A (the root), C (the minor third, which is called a minor third because it is only a tone and a half up from the root), and E (the fifth).
The chords are major or minor to keep the third note within the key. A diminished chord has both a lowered third, and a lowered fifth, in the case of B, an F, to keep it within the key of C.
Hope this helps, it might be a bit in depth, but any questions feel free to ask.
"Dozens of people spontaneously combust each year, it's just not that widely reported".

#5

The numbers stand for the chords of a certain key. For instance, the I chord in the key of C is C major. The IV chord is F maj, and the V chord is G maj. In the major scale the chords go like this: maj, min, min, maj, maj, diminished. So in C you have:
I - C maj
II - D min
III - E min
IV - F maj
V - Gmaj
VI - A min
VII - B Dim
The reason for this is that each chord contains three basic notes, the triad of the root (first note), the third (determines whether it is major or minor) and a fifth. To stay in the key of C, for each chord, this triad has to be built from notes within the key. So if you play a G chord you play G (the root), B (the major third, considered a mjor third if it is to whole tones up froom the root), and D (the fifth).
The chord of A has an A (the root), C (the minor third, which is called a minor third because it is only a tone and a half up from the root), and E (the fifth).
The chords are major or minor to keep the third note within the key. A diminished chord has both a lowered third, and a lowered fifth, in the case of B, an F, to keep it within the key of C.
Hope this helps, it might be a bit in depth, but any questions feel free to ask.
"Dozens of people spontaneously combust each year, it's just not that widely reported".