Broken chords - ???

Guitar Tricks Forum > Music Theory > Broken chords - ???

Grizzled Spellchecker

Joined: 05/09/00

Posts: 2233

What are broken chords? I've heard some of you guys mention them, and it would appear that it is a jazz technique.
... and that's all I have to say about that.

ALL generalizations are WRONG

[/sarcasm]

#1

What are broken chords? I've heard some of you guys mention them, and it would appear that it is a jazz technique.
... and that's all I have to say about that.

ALL generalizations are WRONG

[/sarcasm]

New Member

Joined: 08/10/01

Posts: 5

Been a long time since I've heard that term. We're talking arpeggio here. Hope that helps.
There are two types of people in this world. Those who finish what they started etcetera etcetera

#2

Been a long time since I've heard that term. We're talking arpeggio here. Hope that helps.
There are two types of people in this world. Those who finish what they started etcetera etcetera

Member

Joined: 01/11/01

Posts: 38

I've heard classical guitarists speak about broken chords...and that's when you, instead of playing all the notes of a chord together, play the notes separated, mostly from lowest to highest note, fast. Yeah, it's a kind of arpeggio, but what those classical guitarists do is that they don't mute the strings, but let them ring in to each other and produce a harp-like sound.

that's what the classical guys mean when the say broken chords. the term can also be used for, yes, arpeggio.

#3

I've heard classical guitarists speak about broken chords...and that's when you, instead of playing all the notes of a chord together, play the notes separated, mostly from lowest to highest note, fast. Yeah, it's a kind of arpeggio, but what those classical guitarists do is that they don't mute the strings, but let them ring in to each other and produce a harp-like sound.

that's what the classical guys mean when the say broken chords. the term can also be used for, yes, arpeggio.

New Member

Joined: 08/10/01

Posts: 5

Sorry. Wasn't quite together. Wide is right. It is kind of an arpeggio. If you're playing a Major seventh chord instead of playing 1, 3, 5, 7, you would play 1, 5, 3, 7 or some other abstracted combination. Sorry about the half an answer above.
There are two types of people in this world. Those who finish what they started etcetera etcetera

#4

Sorry. Wasn't quite together. Wide is right. It is kind of an arpeggio. If you're playing a Major seventh chord instead of playing 1, 3, 5, 7, you would play 1, 5, 3, 7 or some other abstracted combination. Sorry about the half an answer above.
There are two types of people in this world. Those who finish what they started etcetera etcetera