Strings touch frets

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Calmsoul11

Registered User

Joined: 07/15/19

Posts: 3

Hi

My A, D and G strings touch the fret board whilst I'm fretting notes Further up. For example I'm fretting notes at the Seventh fret and but they don't ring out. Do I simply adjust the bridge to raise the action to solve this?

Thanks anyone that's able to help

Dan :)

#1

Hi

My A, D and G strings touch the fret board whilst I'm fretting notes Further up. For example I'm fretting notes at the Seventh fret and but they don't ring out. Do I simply adjust the bridge to raise the action to solve this?

Thanks anyone that's able to help

Dan :)

Guitar Tricks Admin

Full Access

Joined: 09/28/05

Posts: 2684

Hi Calmsoul11,

If you're not getting a good tone from the 7th fret, you may want to make some adjustments to the action, for sure.

You may try experimenting with the saddles, or it may be a deeper issue with the truss rod.

what type of guitar is this?

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please contact us.

#2

Hi Calmsoul11,

If you're not getting a good tone from the 7th fret, you may want to make some adjustments to the action, for sure.

You may try experimenting with the saddles, or it may be a deeper issue with the truss rod.

what type of guitar is this?

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please contact us.

Calmsoul11

Registered User

Joined: 07/15/19

Posts: 3

It's a Epiphone Les Paul Standard. That's for the advice I will give it a try :)

Dan

#3

It's a Epiphone Les Paul Standard. That's for the advice I will give it a try :)

Dan

aschleman

Registered User

Joined: 04/26/05

Posts: 2049

You have two points in which you can raise the action on this guitar. One at the bridge and one is the truss rod. Generally speaking, you should want the bridge to provide a pretty low action and compensate the string height with what is called "relief". This is when you put a slight concaved shape into the fretboard from about the 7th fret to the 1st fret. I would Google this for more info or search these forums as I (along with others) have broken it down many times in the past.

Your fretboard shouldn't be straight, basically. If you have switched to a lighter guage strings than you're used to, you might have takent he relief out of the neck and caused the issue. you can do a quick check by "sighting the neck". Hold the guitar and look down the base side of the fret board and see if it's straight, convex, or concaved. Do the same on the treble side of the neck. If it's convex, you have too much relief and you need to tighten the truss rod. If it's concaved already, you have an issue with a high fret or other issue.

#4

You have two points in which you can raise the action on this guitar. One at the bridge and one is the truss rod. Generally speaking, you should want the bridge to provide a pretty low action and compensate the string height with what is called "relief". This is when you put a slight concaved shape into the fretboard from about the 7th fret to the 1st fret. I would Google this for more info or search these forums as I (along with others) have broken it down many times in the past.

Your fretboard shouldn't be straight, basically. If you have switched to a lighter guage strings than you're used to, you might have takent he relief out of the neck and caused the issue. you can do a quick check by "sighting the neck". Hold the guitar and look down the base side of the fret board and see if it's straight, convex, or concaved. Do the same on the treble side of the neck. If it's convex, you have too much relief and you need to tighten the truss rod. If it's concaved already, you have an issue with a high fret or other issue.