Why did you choose the guitar you buyed?

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Tomas E

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Joined: 05/30/19

Posts: 7

People buying things everyday. I wonder what maked you buy just the guitar you buyed?

The first guitar i buyed was an acoustic. I dont remember what brand it was but it was a steel string that sounded amazing. (i still regrett i sold it) I buyed that guitar for 3 reasons it feeled good in my hands and it was a pretty guitar and the price was correct. So when it come to that guitar i wasent so very picky when i picked it up.

My first electric guitar i did a much deeper resarch for before i buyed. I always have liked Gary moore so i tested a les paul in a guitarstore but the neckprofile dident feeled good at all in my hand so i started to test alot of different brands like Fender, ESP etc etc but i dident feeled good with any neckprofiles so i went kinda frustrated. Finally i tested an Ibanez RG and finally i finded what i was looking for a neckprofile that feels very very good in my hand. I want thin neck profiles. So Ibanez is the brand i use and i never have regretted that because they just feels so great in my hands. Today i own 4 guitars 2 electric and 2 acoustic and all 4 is Ibanez. For me it is very importent the instrument feels good in my hand and i feel comfortable with it. I dont want my progress in learning to play to be harder because i dont feel comfortable with the guitar itself so thats why i see that so importent.

#1

People buying things everyday. I wonder what maked you buy just the guitar you buyed?

The first guitar i buyed was an acoustic. I dont remember what brand it was but it was a steel string that sounded amazing. (i still regrett i sold it) I buyed that guitar for 3 reasons it feeled good in my hands and it was a pretty guitar and the price was correct. So when it come to that guitar i wasent so very picky when i picked it up.

My first electric guitar i did a much deeper resarch for before i buyed. I always have liked Gary moore so i tested a les paul in a guitarstore but the neckprofile dident feeled good at all in my hand so i started to test alot of different brands like Fender, ESP etc etc but i dident feeled good with any neckprofiles so i went kinda frustrated. Finally i tested an Ibanez RG and finally i finded what i was looking for a neckprofile that feels very very good in my hand. I want thin neck profiles. So Ibanez is the brand i use and i never have regretted that because they just feels so great in my hands. Today i own 4 guitars 2 electric and 2 acoustic and all 4 is Ibanez. For me it is very importent the instrument feels good in my hand and i feel comfortable with it. I dont want my progress in learning to play to be harder because i dont feel comfortable with the guitar itself so thats why i see that so importent.

manXcat

"It's getting better all the time"♪♪

Joined: 02/17/18

Posts: 686

I think it depends upon which phase of your life you're at. First guitar was 1973 before online or massive music centres. Yamaha nylon string acoustic, probably the forerunner of their current C40. I was still at school, had to pay for it out of earnings from my part time nightfill job, and it was what I could afford. I hadn't even thought beyond acoustic at that phase and was influenced in choice by peers. It served well enough at the time. I played it every day and had a lot of fun with it before career took precedence. In hindsight had I had the benefit of wiser mentor, I would have bought a steel string acoustic had I been able to afford it. A year later I bought an electric, a Japanese made SG clone from a new then unknown brand, Ibanez. Long since 'gone to God'. Loved it.

Enter life's interventions.

First guitar after a 42 year hiatus, Yamaha Pacifica 112V. Knew I wanted electric to learn on for all the obvious reasons learnt from previous experience. Went to my LMS checked out a few Teles, Strats, Les Pauls, Pacificas and took on board advice. Coupled that with online research, but didn't unnecessarily and confusingly overthink it. I knew I liked the Pacifica neck profile, fingerboard radius, string spacing, comfort, tone and HSS Strat versatility from its Korean G&B pups. In particular, Yamaha cleaned up all the rest in segment in the value for money & overall quality stakes. Being a do it now action type once committed, I placed my order a couple of days later. 'First guitar' Nov 2017 Old Violin Sunburst Pacifica 112V. A month in I knew I wanted an acoustic to play as well. Didn't take long to work out the one for me was Yamaha's APX600, then their just newly released model superseding the APX500III.

Bought a few more since. Life's short, getting shorter every day. 😎

"Life is just a bowl of cherries ...."

#2

I think it depends upon which phase of your life you're at. First guitar was 1973 before online or massive music centres. Yamaha nylon string acoustic, probably the forerunner of their current C40. I was still at school, had to pay for it out of earnings from my part time nightfill job, and it was what I could afford. I hadn't even thought beyond acoustic at that phase and was influenced in choice by peers. It served well enough at the time. I played it every day and had a lot of fun with it before career took precedence. In hindsight had I had the benefit of wiser mentor, I would have bought a steel string acoustic had I been able to afford it. A year later I bought an electric, a Japanese made SG clone from a new then unknown brand, Ibanez. Long since 'gone to God'. Loved it.

Enter life's interventions.

First guitar after a 42 year hiatus, Yamaha Pacifica 112V. Knew I wanted electric to learn on for all the obvious reasons learnt from previous experience. Went to my LMS checked out a few Teles, Strats, Les Pauls, Pacificas and took on board advice. Coupled that with online research, but didn't unnecessarily and confusingly overthink it. I knew I liked the Pacifica neck profile, fingerboard radius, string spacing, comfort, tone and HSS Strat versatility from its Korean G&B pups. In particular, Yamaha cleaned up all the rest in segment in the value for money & overall quality stakes. Being a do it now action type once committed, I placed my order a couple of days later. 'First guitar' Nov 2017 Old Violin Sunburst Pacifica 112V. A month in I knew I wanted an acoustic to play as well. Didn't take long to work out the one for me was Yamaha's APX600, then their just newly released model superseding the APX500III.

Bought a few more since. Life's short, getting shorter every day. 😎

"Life is just a bowl of cherries ...."

PhxSon

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Joined: 04/29/19

Posts: 9

My first guitars were gifts: a Harmony...something...that a high school friend gave me, and a Les Paul Standard that my parents bought me for graduation. The Harmony was regifted to another friend, and I kept the Les Paul.

Fast forward a few years. Still had the Gibson, but I couldn't resist a beautiful, eminently playable Hamer FM Special, which I loved and which became numero uno almost immediately. It takes quite an axe to usurp a 1980 Les Paul Standard, but the Hamer did it. I think they're one of the most underrated guitar makers out there.

Some years later, while I was at work one night, some burglars decided that they wanted those guitars more than I did. (They also helped themselves to my television, computer, lots of personal documents, my son's Jazz Bass, and a few other things. I don't who they are--they've never been caught--but rest assured, I hate them.)

In all honesty, by that time I was working long, odd hours, and hadn't been playing regularly for years. For all I know the burglars did use them more than I had been. Thus began a time of not owning any instruments at all, and letting whatever skillset I had dissolve.

Fast forward a few more years. I decided to stop by the local Guitar Center, just to see what they had. You know...browse, not buy anything.

Ha. I walked out with a butterscotch blonde Telecaster. I'd always wanted one...and now I have it. And now I'm using it every day as I start my guitar playing days over again, starting with Guitar Fundamentals 1 here and working back into it.

I agree with Tomas and manXcat. Tomas bought his guitars because they felt good in his hands and he was comfortable with them--for my money, perhaps the most important reason to choose one guitar over another. That's the reason I bought mine. Each of them felt great. The new Tele is no exception.

And I agree with manX when he says it depends on where you are in life. The Les Paul and the Hamer were heavy guitars with fire-breathing humbuckers, and all I wanted from them was tons of gain and loads of crunch. I was a high school kid in the eighties, and it was all about metal.

Now I'm north of fifty. I still enjoy listening to metal guitar, and I'm always impressed by its speed and power. I have no interest in playing metal at all. Now, as I rebuild my chops and knowledge, I'm far more enthused about other guitar styles, and want to work on them. Blues and jazz are what excite me now.

So I bought my Telecaster because it felt great in my hands--I knew within five minutes of picking it up that it was leaving the store with me. And I bought it because it offers amazing tonal range, so I can play thick blues lines and clean country licks with it, but I can still crank it up and have it scream if I ever get the urge again. So I also bought it because of where I am in life and where I want to go with my playing.

And that's my story...

#3

My first guitars were gifts: a Harmony...something...that a high school friend gave me, and a Les Paul Standard that my parents bought me for graduation. The Harmony was regifted to another friend, and I kept the Les Paul.

Fast forward a few years. Still had the Gibson, but I couldn't resist a beautiful, eminently playable Hamer FM Special, which I loved and which became numero uno almost immediately. It takes quite an axe to usurp a 1980 Les Paul Standard, but the Hamer did it. I think they're one of the most underrated guitar makers out there.

Some years later, while I was at work one night, some burglars decided that they wanted those guitars more than I did. (They also helped themselves to my television, computer, lots of personal documents, my son's Jazz Bass, and a few other things. I don't who they are--they've never been caught--but rest assured, I hate them.)

In all honesty, by that time I was working long, odd hours, and hadn't been playing regularly for years. For all I know the burglars did use them more than I had been. Thus began a time of not owning any instruments at all, and letting whatever skillset I had dissolve.

Fast forward a few more years. I decided to stop by the local Guitar Center, just to see what they had. You know...browse, not buy anything.

Ha. I walked out with a butterscotch blonde Telecaster. I'd always wanted one...and now I have it. And now I'm using it every day as I start my guitar playing days over again, starting with Guitar Fundamentals 1 here and working back into it.

I agree with Tomas and manXcat. Tomas bought his guitars because they felt good in his hands and he was comfortable with them--for my money, perhaps the most important reason to choose one guitar over another. That's the reason I bought mine. Each of them felt great. The new Tele is no exception.

And I agree with manX when he says it depends on where you are in life. The Les Paul and the Hamer were heavy guitars with fire-breathing humbuckers, and all I wanted from them was tons of gain and loads of crunch. I was a high school kid in the eighties, and it was all about metal.

Now I'm north of fifty. I still enjoy listening to metal guitar, and I'm always impressed by its speed and power. I have no interest in playing metal at all. Now, as I rebuild my chops and knowledge, I'm far more enthused about other guitar styles, and want to work on them. Blues and jazz are what excite me now.

So I bought my Telecaster because it felt great in my hands--I knew within five minutes of picking it up that it was leaving the store with me. And I bought it because it offers amazing tonal range, so I can play thick blues lines and clean country licks with it, but I can still crank it up and have it scream if I ever get the urge again. So I also bought it because of where I am in life and where I want to go with my playing.

And that's my story...

manXcat

"It's getting better all the time"♪♪

Joined: 02/17/18

Posts: 686

Really good read PhxSon. Are you a professional writer per chance?


Seen and heard the Hamers on YT. Impressive guitars. Understand why they are sought after.

I get ya' on the Butterscotch Blonde Tele too. It was an image of one which reignited my imagination starting the whole reinterest process rolling into firm committment re-entering this captivating pastime.

"Life is just a bowl of cherries ...."

#4

Really good read PhxSon. Are you a professional writer per chance?


Seen and heard the Hamers on YT. Impressive guitars. Understand why they are sought after.

I get ya' on the Butterscotch Blonde Tele too. It was an image of one which reignited my imagination starting the whole reinterest process rolling into firm committment re-entering this captivating pastime.

"Life is just a bowl of cherries ...."

PhxSon

Full Access

Joined: 04/29/19

Posts: 9

Thanks manX, but no, I'm not a professional. I do enjoy writing though.

There's just something about a Tele. The design really is timeless. I know Bruce's isn't completely stock, but if you look at this album cover, and you want one, then you've got the fever...

uploaded image

#5

Thanks manX, but no, I'm not a professional. I do enjoy writing though.

There's just something about a Tele. The design really is timeless. I know Bruce's isn't completely stock, but if you look at this album cover, and you want one, then you've got the fever...

uploaded image

manXcat

"It's getting better all the time"♪♪

Joined: 02/17/18

Posts: 686

Apart from being a Classic, the Tele body and headstock shape are a perennially stylish design regardless that they are coincidently signature of an era. I find them the most physically comfortable of the classics, ES, LP, SG, Strat & Tele. And practical too with a bolt on neck.


These days being spoilt for choice, there are just so many variations of Tele custom body, bridge and pickup configs, their versatility has expanded beyond the stereotype. e.g. Muse

Of all the conventional electric styles I've tried so far, I find the Tele style the most comfortable physical fit for me. Pic of my fav guitar from my studio electric rack.

"Life is just a bowl of cherries ...."

#6

Apart from being a Classic, the Tele body and headstock shape are a perennially stylish design regardless that they are coincidently signature of an era. I find them the most physically comfortable of the classics, ES, LP, SG, Strat & Tele. And practical too with a bolt on neck.


These days being spoilt for choice, there are just so many variations of Tele custom body, bridge and pickup configs, their versatility has expanded beyond the stereotype. e.g. Muse

Of all the conventional electric styles I've tried so far, I find the Tele style the most comfortable physical fit for me. Pic of my fav guitar from my studio electric rack.

"Life is just a bowl of cherries ...."

iiholly

hmm

Joined: 07/29/02

Posts: 2368

I am not very big on gear, so when I do buy I usually just play ground until I find something I like the sound of. I usually know the general type I want -> electric, classical, acoustic, etc - but beyond that I go in with an open mind.

Recently I picked up a Gretsch at a store in New Orleans that restores instruments. It was a great deal and knew the guy so got a discount on top of it. I'm in loooove with the tone.

#7

I am not very big on gear, so when I do buy I usually just play ground until I find something I like the sound of. I usually know the general type I want -> electric, classical, acoustic, etc - but beyond that I go in with an open mind.

Recently I picked up a Gretsch at a store in New Orleans that restores instruments. It was a great deal and knew the guy so got a discount on top of it. I'm in loooove with the tone.

pwshvr

Full Access

Joined: 04/18/19

Posts: 3

Got my first real six string

Bought it at the five and dime

No really, Bryan Adams inspired me to get a Les Paul (copy) when I was 15. After I became obsessed with heavy metal I wanted something fancier so I got an Ibanez later on. Now I am mostly a strat player due to the way they feel. I still have an Ibanez RG but I don't really like the floyd rose.

#8

Got my first real six string

Bought it at the five and dime

No really, Bryan Adams inspired me to get a Les Paul (copy) when I was 15. After I became obsessed with heavy metal I wanted something fancier so I got an Ibanez later on. Now I am mostly a strat player due to the way they feel. I still have an Ibanez RG but I don't really like the floyd rose.