Bouncing pick...

Guitar Tricks Forum > Technique and Style > Bouncing pick...

leardtimothy

Registered User

Joined: 07/29/21

Posts: 3

I've been working on keeping my pick strokes to a minimum, also picking depth, but when I speed up I get the pick bouncing, any tips on alleviating this problem? TY

#1

I've been working on keeping my pick strokes to a minimum, also picking depth, but when I speed up I get the pick bouncing, any tips on alleviating this problem? TY

ChristopherSchlegel

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 08/09/05

Posts: 7379

Originally Posted by: leardtimothy

I've been working on keeping my pick strokes to a minimum, also picking depth, but when I speed up I get the pick bouncing, any tips on alleviating this problem? TY

You've got a good list including some the important points: minimal motion & shallow pick depth. Here are some other points to consider:

1. Tilt the pick to make it easier to graze lightly over the string.

2. Use a thicker pick. This definitely helps me from having the pick bounce around.

3. Use less tension, or a lighter grip, on the pick.

This is all very counter intuitive! The faster you go, the more intense or dramatic it sounds. And the more your body tenses up to deal with a complex physical process. But in order to play faster you absolutely must relax & stay loose!

I am currently updating my speed building tutorial to cover these points! Hope this helps!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

#2

Originally Posted by: leardtimothy

I've been working on keeping my pick strokes to a minimum, also picking depth, but when I speed up I get the pick bouncing, any tips on alleviating this problem? TY

You've got a good list including some the important points: minimal motion & shallow pick depth. Here are some other points to consider:

1. Tilt the pick to make it easier to graze lightly over the string.

2. Use a thicker pick. This definitely helps me from having the pick bounce around.

3. Use less tension, or a lighter grip, on the pick.

This is all very counter intuitive! The faster you go, the more intense or dramatic it sounds. And the more your body tenses up to deal with a complex physical process. But in order to play faster you absolutely must relax & stay loose!

I am currently updating my speed building tutorial to cover these points! Hope this helps!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

leardtimothy

Registered User

Joined: 07/29/21

Posts: 3

Ty, I do use pick slanting and edging, I also use the John Pettrucii Dunlop picks, I think it's in my picking grip, seems to be tight, I am trying to relax more..

#3

Ty, I do use pick slanting and edging, I also use the John Pettrucii Dunlop picks, I think it's in my picking grip, seems to be tight, I am trying to relax more..

JeffS65

Full Access

Joined: 10/07/08

Posts: 1546

Originally Posted by: leardtimothy

Ty, I do use pick slanting and edging, I also use the John Pettrucii Dunlop picks, I think it's in my picking grip, seems to be tight, I am trying to relax more..

There's a point to this. Also, consider your wrist motion as well. Depending on how long you've been playing, a frequent issue with playing in the earlier stages is what I call 'jackhammer' picking/strumming. Like Chris has mentioned; the quicker you go, the more you tense up. Go watch Jimi Hendrix play rhythm. You can see the fluidity in his picking hand. He's not ridged at all and ther's a lesson to that too. The more fluid your movements, the less bouncing and stiff ringing of the strings occurs (you know, that BOING! of an over-struck string).

Honestly, it's always a good practice to just pick a chord and string on it. In this way, you can focus on how you're strumming. You don't have to worry about chord changes for this excersize (when, when you're trying to get your strum down, can add to the tension). It's just one part of building a broader skillset.

#4

Originally Posted by: leardtimothy

Ty, I do use pick slanting and edging, I also use the John Pettrucii Dunlop picks, I think it's in my picking grip, seems to be tight, I am trying to relax more..

There's a point to this. Also, consider your wrist motion as well. Depending on how long you've been playing, a frequent issue with playing in the earlier stages is what I call 'jackhammer' picking/strumming. Like Chris has mentioned; the quicker you go, the more you tense up. Go watch Jimi Hendrix play rhythm. You can see the fluidity in his picking hand. He's not ridged at all and ther's a lesson to that too. The more fluid your movements, the less bouncing and stiff ringing of the strings occurs (you know, that BOING! of an over-struck string).

Honestly, it's always a good practice to just pick a chord and string on it. In this way, you can focus on how you're strumming. You don't have to worry about chord changes for this excersize (when, when you're trying to get your strum down, can add to the tension). It's just one part of building a broader skillset.

ChristopherSchlegel

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 08/09/05

Posts: 7379

Originally Posted by: leardtimothy

Ty, I do use pick slanting and edging, I also use the John Pettrucii Dunlop picks, I think it's in my picking grip, seems to be tight, I am trying to relax more..

Yes, try to stay as relaxed as possible. Not only in your grip, but also your entire posture. Especially from shoulder to elbow to wrist to fingers.

It takes conscious effort at first to make yourself stay loose. So be aware of when you are tensing in order to counteract it. The more you consciously make yourself stay loose, the more it will gradually become second nature. And then once it's automated you won't have to focus on it as much or any more.

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

#5

Originally Posted by: leardtimothy

Ty, I do use pick slanting and edging, I also use the John Pettrucii Dunlop picks, I think it's in my picking grip, seems to be tight, I am trying to relax more..

Yes, try to stay as relaxed as possible. Not only in your grip, but also your entire posture. Especially from shoulder to elbow to wrist to fingers.

It takes conscious effort at first to make yourself stay loose. So be aware of when you are tensing in order to counteract it. The more you consciously make yourself stay loose, the more it will gradually become second nature. And then once it's automated you won't have to focus on it as much or any more.

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

leardtimothy

Registered User

Joined: 07/29/21

Posts: 3

Thank You !!

#6

Thank You !!