Applied Guitar Theory


flyonthemoon596
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flyonthemoon596
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11/24/2022 11:56 pm

I've never seen any books or lessons that teach all these items in a graduated format, beginning to advanced guitar: scales, chords, and arpeggios, and how to use them in one course or lesson. Each lesson would consider scales, chords, and arpeggios in the same lesson.


Obviously, there's no end to theory, but I'd like to see lessons of this sort, each one complete in itself from beginner or intermediate to advanced [insorar as is possible]. After all, music theory is one of those deliciously infinite concepts humans have conceived of.


For example, a lesson could start with the major scale, its chords and arpeggios, and how to apply them in one lesson. The course would continue in a graduated way so that one could learn theory as far as one could go. [As I said, guitar theory would be impossible to completely cover, but I think this would be an ongoing, digestible way to present guitar theory.]


These lessons would NOT include sheet reading alone, but WOULD include standard notation and TAB.


May you always love playing and learning the wonderful guitar instrument,
Fly On The Moon


edited
# 1
ChristopherSchlegel
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ChristopherSchlegel
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11/25/2022 3:54 pm

Any good guitar curriculum is applied guitar theory. 


Music theory is the set of concepts that describes the nature of musical events. It is the process of mentally identifying the sounds that occur in music. We do this in order to build a consistent set of ideas to describe what happens in music.  So if you follow the Guitar Fundamentals courses here at GT you will find that the theory concepts are integrated into the material along with the way.


My GF 2 course in particular will show you the fundamental concepts of scales, chords, reading music, etc. (all foundation theory concepts) along with practical exercises that you use to apply those ideas in a musical context.


https://www.guitartricks.com/course/fundamentals2(discontinued)


That course is beginner level material.  Keep in mind that your theory learning should keep pace with your physical skills, your ability to apply the ideas you are learning.  That's another element of a good curriculum.  Making sure you get enough ideas to apply to the level you are currently at while helping prepare you for the next level of concepts & skills.


As you watch it consider which of these 3 options fit your situation.


If your conceptual understanding or your playing skills are below the material in the above course, then that's a great place to start.


If your skills are above that material, but your conceptual understanding is not, then it will be a good way to learn those concepts while you get exercises to apply them. 


If you understand the concepts but your skill level isn't there yet, then it will be a great place to review & solidify the ideas while you build your skills to catch up to your theory knowledge.


It's also possible you are an absolute beginner which means you should probably start at GF1. 


https://www.guitartricks.com/course/guitarfundamentals1v1(discontinued)


You can also try the newer GF courses by Anders or Lisa.


https://www.guitartricks.com/course/fundamentals1


Once, (or if!) you have all that theory knowledge & practical skills under your command, you can move on to more advanced & specialized topics.  I have collections of tutorials that address topics like triad chords & inversions, scale patterns covering the fretboard, learning to improvise, learning lead guitar, etc.


There's also a stand alone tutorial that provides a brief overview of music theory, what it consists of at all levels.


https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial/495/next-lesson


And that's part of a larger collection of tutorials that cover a wide range of music theory topics for those with a deeper interest.


https://www.guitartricks.com/collection/Music-Theory


Ultimately how much theory any student learns depends on their individual skill level & musical goals.  So when you mention:


"For example, a lesson could start with the major scale, its chords and arpeggios, and how to apply them in one lesson."


My tutorial on Scales & Chord Relationships (in the GF2 course linked above & the Music Theory collection) does just that at a beginner level.  And my later lessons also integrate those ideas in a practical ways at more intermediate & advanced levels.


Take it one step at a time.  Make sure your theory & practice keep pace with each other.  Please ask more if necessary & best of success with your guitar learning & playing!


edited
Christopher Schlegel
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# 2
s.he.ydababi5161
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s.he.ydababi5161
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02/07/2023 8:48 am

Music theory is a super powerful tool for guitar players. It helps you navigate the fretboard, makes it easier to communicate with other musicians and deepens your understanding of music. In short: music theory can make you into a better guitarist and musician.


# 3
randallbrewer29
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randallbrewer29
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06/01/2023 7:53 am

I agree that theory is important. However, with music we need to learn to feel more. Theory will only be a tool to help us improve our skills. And a good piece of music comes from the way we perceive and interpret it.


redactle


 


# 4
dmitry.digi
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dmitry.digi
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06/01/2023 8:20 am

How I can find other collections on the site, e.g. where this https://www.guitartricks.com/collection/Music-Theory is listed? 


# 5
ChristopherSchlegel
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ChristopherSchlegel
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06/01/2023 2:02 pm
#5 Originally Posted by: dmitry.digi

How I can find other collections on the site, e.g. where this https://www.guitartricks.com/collection/Music-Theory is listed? 

At the bottom of the GT homepage there is a row of links to collections.  There is also a button to click to view them all.  It goes to this page.


https://www.guitartricks.com/collections


Hope that helps!


 


Christopher Schlegel
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# 6
Whune
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Whune
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06/01/2023 9:23 pm

unrequested advice:


Deconstruct songs.


 


Analyze how the masters [apply theory]


I put that in brackets because to me it's more like 


[how the masters compose harmonic structure]*


because cats like Cobain did it intuitively; 


but if you know some theory... what he does makes sense in theory terms


 


E.G.


"Breed"


To my ear it resolves to F#


so that's my tonal center/ 1


 


the intro/Verse Riff


Rapidly alternates between F#5 & open E (m7) + the sustained C# (5)


punctuated with the bend from A to Bb (3m, 3) classic blues move


then the open E (m7) to bring it back to F#5


makes a great riffing loop


Then the chorus


is just banging away on a diad of F#5 inverted and a higher register; so it sounds very different but feels like it belongs


then theres the thing of


so does it function like a Vsus4; because of the inversion; or is it functioning as a variation of the 1; becasue of the inversion, the F# is going to stand out more)..?


I'd think the latter; but to me there's some tension in it


but at the end of the day... it doesn't matter... because Cobain was just doing what he liked the sound of


then chorus descends quickly through dim5, 4 then open 6 then a slide from a diad of m3 and 6


the so whole chorus riff is really just riffing on the 1 chord; but it's got all this circular motion in doing so


the bridge 


m6, m3, dim5, 4; repeating until resolved with verse riff


 


*the same way visual masters use color and value and composition of shapes


or writers use aspects of plot structure and character and narrative; and etc


 


# 7

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