Caged Scales


dyrusnlclan
Registered User
Joined: 01/04/22
Posts: 1

Hi. I have been playing guitar for 5 years but the last couple of weeks ive been learning the CAGED system. The caged in C Major is no problem for me.

Question: But what if the key is in A Major? D major? etc.. The pattern must change from the C Major pattern with some new notes right? Any tips how i can learn this? Cant manage to find a lesson for the other Keys.

Cheers


# 0
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 7,857
Originally Posted by: dyrusnlclan

Question: But what if the key is in A Major?[/quote][p]You slide all the shapes over so the root note (circled) number 1 is on the letter A.

Originally Posted by: dyrusnlclanthe D major?

You slide all the shapes over so the root note (circled) number 1 is on the letter D.

[quote=dyrusnlclan]The pattern must change from the C Major pattern with some new notes right?

No. In fact that's the entire point behind the CAGED system: it's the same shapes & patterns (the scale & chord degrees) simply moved over & applied to a different set of musical alphabet letters.

This is the same principle behind barre chords & scales. The fact that the guitar is very pattern oriented is what makes CAGED a helpful visual guide for some players.

I cover CAGED for rhythm guitar in this tutorial. If you work through this tutorial, you'll see that I generate an entire chord progression of different chords but using the same shapes every time.

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=2614

This one is CAGED for lead guitar.

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=2619

Please ask more if necessary. Hope this helps! Best of success!


Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 2
fixslayrlini
Registered User
Joined: 02/10/22
Posts: 1
Originally Posted by: ChristopherSchlegel
Originally Posted by: dyrusnlclan

Question: But what if the key is in A Major?[/quote][p]You slide all the shapes over so the root note (circled) number 1 is on the letter A.

Originally Posted by: dyrusnlclanthe D major?

You slide all the shapes over so the root note (circled) number 1 is on the letter D.

[quote=dyrusnlclan]The pattern must change from the C Major pattern with some new notes right?

No. In fact that's the entire point behind the CAGED system: it's the same shapes & patterns (the scale & chord degrees) simply moved over & applied to a different set of musical alphabet letters.

This is the same principle behind barre chords & scales. The fact that the guitar is very pattern oriented is what makes CAGED a helpful visual guide for some players.

I cover CAGED for rhythm guitar in this tutorial. If you work through this tutorial, you'll see that I generate an entire chord progression of different chords but using the same shapes every time.

This one is CAGED for lead guitar.

Please ask more if necessary. Hope this helps! Best of success!

Many thanks for that.


# 3
snojones
Full Access
Joined: 04/17/13
Posts: 658

That sliding up and down trick is why guitar is such a good instrument to improvise on. Unlike piano or woodwinds the scale pattern is the same, no mater the key. I suspect this is the same for all stringed instruments... though I have never played a fiddle. Drums also get a pass on all the scale changes, but they loose all the scales to do it.


Captcha is a total pain in the........

# 4
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 7,857
Originally Posted by: snojonesThat sliding up and down trick is why guitar is such a good instrument to improvise on.[/quote]

That's a good observation. It's also one of the primary reasons the guitar is such a good do-it-yourself instrument. Once you understand how the patterns work & make certain consistent sets of sounds, then you can play a great variety of musical things. Ironically it makes it much easier to grasp the underlying music theory, but at the same time makes it possible to not have to know as much of it to play music, because you can lean on the patterns.

Originally Posted by: snojonesUnlike piano or woodwinds the scale pattern is the same, no mater the key.

True! The piano does have some visual elements that make it a little easier to grasp the underlying theory. But each key as a unique set of black & white configurations!

And winds & brass are completely out of luck here! There's just no visual element to the arrangement of buttons, valves & embouchure. The only clue you get is music notation & fingering guides.

[quote=snojones]I suspect this is the same for all stringed instruments... though I have never played a fiddle.

Yes, the violin family also shares this visual aspect, but it's a little bit more removed from immediate visual perception because they lack frets. The frets on the guitar make it really easy to immediately, visually perceive patterns.


Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 5