Singing saying note names or intervals or solfege?


jggonzalez230
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Joined: 06/20/19
Posts: 6
jggonzalez230
Full Access
Joined: 06/20/19
Posts: 6
06/23/2020 6:22 am

Alright, so I've designed a new practice routine to help me memorize and play through my scales and the associated arpeggios. And, most importantly, recognize which interval is where in each shape.

Here is the routine:

Pick a key to focus on for the entire practice session, for example: G

Write the notes out: G a b C D e F# G

Select two adjacent patterns (i.e. Major scale patterns 3 and 4, or the "G" and "E" CAGED shapes.

Play the chord shape associated with that pattern.

Play the scale for pattern one in thirds (Thanks, Christopher!), slide up to the next pattern, repeat descending.

Play the arpeggio triads of interest (i.e. 1, 3, 5) in each scale.

My question is, would it be more beneficial to sing the note names or the intervals or use solfege.

The major benefit of singing the note names would help improve my speed of knowing exactly which note I'm on, which will be useful when expanding outside of the major/minor scales.

Singing the interval or solfege would be useful for moving these shapes to the other keys and instantly recognizing where the intervals are in relation to one another, no matter the key. I.e. The 5th is usually directly above the root note, except between the third and second string. Or the 3rd is one string and one (or two, if a minor 3rd) lower than the root.

Has anyone done something similar and can talk me through your thought process?

Thanks!


# 1
JeffS65
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Joined: 10/07/08
Posts: 1,602
JeffS65
Registered User
Joined: 10/07/08
Posts: 1,602
06/23/2020 5:57 pm
Originally Posted by: jggonzalez230

Alright, so I've designed a new practice routine to help me memorize and play through my scales and the associated arpeggios. And, most importantly, recognize which interval is where in each shape.

Here is the routine:

Pick a key to focus on for the entire practice session, for example: G

Write the notes out: G a b C D e F# G

Select two adjacent patterns (i.e. Major scale patterns 3 and 4, or the "G" and "E" CAGED shapes.

Play the chord shape associated with that pattern.

Play the scale for pattern one in thirds (Thanks, Christopher!), slide up to the next pattern, repeat descending.

Play the arpeggio triads of interest (i.e. 1, 3, 5) in each scale.

My question is, would it be more beneficial to sing the note names or the intervals or use solfege.

The major benefit of singing the note names would help improve my speed of knowing exactly which note I'm on, which will be useful when expanding outside of the major/minor scales.

Singing the interval or solfege would be useful for moving these shapes to the other keys and instantly recognizing where the intervals are in relation to one another, no matter the key. I.e. The 5th is usually directly above the root note, except between the third and second string. Or the 3rd is one string and one (or two, if a minor 3rd) lower than the root.

Has anyone done something similar and can talk me through your thought process?

Thanks!

I can't speak to the theory of this but sounding out the note you're playing can never hurt. So long as you are in tune, that is! With that said, knowing any given note audibly can only help you and in many ways.


# 2
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,349
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,349
06/24/2020 11:48 am
Originally Posted by: jggonzalez230And, most importantly, recognize which interval is where in each shape.[/quote]

Exactly.

Originally Posted by: jggonzalez230My question is, would it be more beneficial to sing the note names or the intervals or use solfege.

All of those are beneficial. Especially if you've not yet completely memorized the note names on the fretboard. And the solfege can help if you are a singer or intend to sing. But in my estimation the scale interval is the most important.

[quote=jggonzalez230]Has anyone done something similar and can talk me through your thought process?

I learned the note names well before I grasped the intervals. So I already had those automated. The scale intervals are the most practical.

The solfege is fine too, especially if you are already used to it. But keep in mind that the solfege just adds another layer of data in between the sound & location of the note & it's scale interval.

Hope that helps!


Christopher Schlegel
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Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 3
jggonzalez230
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Joined: 06/20/19
Posts: 6
jggonzalez230
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Joined: 06/20/19
Posts: 6
06/25/2020 9:15 am
Originally Posted by: ChristopherSchlegel
Originally Posted by: jggonzalez230And, most importantly, recognize which interval is where in each shape.[/quote]

Exactly.

Originally Posted by: jggonzalez230My question is, would it be more beneficial to sing the note names or the intervals or use solfege.

All of those are beneficial. Especially if you've not yet completely memorized the note names on the fretboard. And the solfege can help if you are a singer or intend to sing. But in my estimation the scale interval is the most important.

[quote=jggonzalez230]Has anyone done something similar and can talk me through your thought process?

I learned the note names well before I grasped the intervals. So I already had those automated. The scale intervals are the most practical.

The solfege is fine too, especially if you are already used to it. But keep in mind that the solfege just adds another layer of data in between the sound & location of the note & it's scale interval.

Hope that helps!

Good point. I think I'll opt for intervals at this point. I am pretty good with the note names, as I can look down and know what note I'm playing, but not as fast as I like just yet.


# 4
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,349
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,349
06/26/2020 2:08 pm
Originally Posted by: jggonzalez230

Good point. I think I'll opt for intervals at this point. I am pretty good with the note names, as I can look down and know what note I'm playing, but not as fast as I like just yet.

Good deal!


Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 5

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